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Tuesday Open Thread 24 October 2006

Posted by marisacat in 2006 Mid Terms, DC Politics, Inconvenient Voice of the Voter.
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Chris Hedges has an interesting piece on the political power of genocide – after the fact – in a discussion of the Armenian genocide and the modern use of the Holocaust.

[T]hese questions circle back to the dangerous sanctification of any genocide, the belief that one ethnic group can represent goodness, solely because its members are the victims, and another evil because from its ranks come the thugs who carry out mass slaughter.  Once these demented killing machines begin their work the only thing unique is the method of murder.  The lesson of any genocide is not that one group of human beings is better than another, but that in the intoxication of the moment, gripped by the mass hypnosis of state propaganda and the lust for violence, we can all become killers.  All the victims must be heard.  None are unique.  And all of us have to be on guard lest we be seduced.  We carry within us—German, Jew, Armenian or Christian—dark and dangerous lusts that must be held in check.  I applaud the French.  I hope the French action pushes the Turks toward contrition and honesty.  But I do not wish for the Armenians to covet the Holocaust, to begin the process of sanctifying their own suffering.  When we sanctify ourselves we do so at the expense of others.

In the body of the piece, he writes of the need for Turkey to acknowledge, apologise for their own sake as well as for the Armenians.  And I have to think, as we blame the Iraqis for all that has passed across nearly 4 years since our invasion, who will make us apologise?  No one, I would suppose.

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aemd linked to this in the previous thread, Billmon on an aspect of the Republican … by now I have to call it their instinctive battle plan.

[N]o, what’s interesting is that the Rovians felt compelled to volley back on the sex stuff in a way they never have with more garden-variety corruption charges, like those raised in the Abramoff-related scandals. Clearly, something in their polling or focus group work has convinced them this is different and far more dangerous.

There are exceptions, of course — the Abramoff connnection appears to be sinking Conrad Burns out in Montana, for example — but one gets the distinct impression that graft, bribery and fraud no longer pack much of a political punch with the American electorate. I mean, if the scandals of the past few years (the pecuniary equivalent of projectile vomiting) have had so little effect that the Rovian brain trust doesn’t even think it has to hit back, it tells you something.

Likewise, if the voters only now are putting on a semi-serious anger over the lost war in Iraq — hands down the most deceptive, corrupt and wholly botched government enterprise since . . . well, Hurricane Katrina — you have to wonder what it takes to get a rise out of the American people. But of course we already know what it takes: something that will really get a rise out of them, if you follow me.  [snip]

In fairness, as I share aemd’s take –  and here is a snip of his/her thoughts on Nov 7 from the previous thread

[A]fter the Reed/Abramoff scam, well…the last straw. All the hate backfired, bigtime.

Is it enough to get a solid majority in the House and Senate? IMHO, no. A couple of things are working against the Dems. First is over a decade worth of high tech, balls to the wall, GOP fundin’ and work on their GOTV. While the Dems are playin’ catch up, the GOP is moving to the next level. Second is, well, ego, the final coup. In a year where the GOP is so down in the polls, what a final stroke for the Rove machine to come out on top. Talk about makin’ headlines! [snip]

let me link to Tuston’s comment from the same thread.

A snip:

[M]y reasoning surely would be termed the CT over at daily cocks and cockettes, and I can’t claim to arrive at my answer through any identifiable and verefiable instrument other than my own native internal calculus of intuititive integration of what info I pick up.

I have to disagree that the press are “setting up” the democrats but I think we are getting a dose of hype that won’t be lived up to. (I’ll freely admit that I ay be having a pipe dream, though)

I’m going toss circumspection and caution to my overblown wind as well as abandon my obsession with the satanism of sarcasm and make my own serious prediction of 23 and 5 (hmm those are some familiar primes)  [snip]

Hope and cynicism… ;)  But no graphs.  Not today anyway… 

Killing a chicken at High Noon to read the entrails tho…

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UPDATE, 9:10 am

Not a graph… ;) but a good read all the same from Who is IOZ [thanks to my emailer]

[S]mith doesn’t come right out and say it, but there’s a name for a political ideology based on a projected, utopian past that can only be reacquired through political acts whereby the cultural radicals are ousted and an imaginary old order restored: conservative.

Kos and his followers imagine themselves bolsheviks of Democratic liberalism, but their political ideology, such as it is, is deeply conservative. It serves up a unidentifiable, unspecified time of general well-being and social harmony, a status quo in which the only change that occured was “progress” in an exceedingly vague sense of a general improvement to the social and economic wellbeing of the society as a whole. It locates the rupture with that vision in certain political triumphs of its opponents, whom it accuses of revolutionarism. It dedicates its political actions to the recapture of such a past, which was taken away, and which must now be taken back. Things were better before, and once we go back, they’ll be better in the future again.

In that confusion of verb tenses you find the abject failure of the dreaming insurgents of the Democratic party.

Don’t miss the comment.  Love that ”grab” metaphor…  paucity of rhetoric on display.

As I read this I heard a very soft shoe debate with Conrad Burns in the run for ND senate….  I had to laugh, the Repub challenger (Grotberg was the name iirc) appeared to run against Burns’ vote for the war.  That pesky IWR the Dems would like to forget.

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Comments»

1. D. Throat - 24 October 2006

I have a prediction based on nothing but gut feelings:

***A major win in the mid term elections for Democratic candidates in the House and Senate will have castrophic repercussions on Hilliary presidential campaign.****

She will not be able to run a Kerry “any body but…” campaign.. the last refuge of a truly depised candidate. People will feel more at ease to vote their conscious knowing that the federal “checks and balances” (supposedly) have been restored… breathing space.

Hill s problem is that she refuses to stand for anything and if she listened to her husband … the one wise thing he said is that “People will go for strong and wrong every time … over weak and right”… well Hill is weak and wrong….weak not because she will match kill of r kill against McCain… weak because she is following McCains lead and letting him set the agenda.

2. cactus ed - 24 October 2006

Recommended diary:

When we read stuff into what people write, it creates conflict and flamewars. All of the fights that happened over the life of this site — Dean/Clark, the Pie Wars, the fraud diaries — have probably resulted from people who read stuff into other people’s writings that were simply not there.

Horseshit.

3. TustonDAZ - 24 October 2006

There’s definetely some adjustments in PR going on in Bushco. This caught my attention this morning:

Iraqis may control security in 12-18 mos By CHRISTOPHER BODEEN, Associated Press Writer

BAGHDAD, Iraq – U.S. officials said Tuesday Iraqi leaders have agreed to develop a timeline by the end of the year for progress in stabilizing Iraq, and Iraqi forces should be able to take full control of security in the country in the next 12 to 18 months with “some level” of American support.

Even as October marked the deadliest month for U.S. forces in Iraq this year, with 89 American servicemembers killed in combat so far, the top U.S. commander in Iraq said he felt the United States should continue to focus on drawing down American forces in the country.

Regardless, Gen. George Casey said he would not hesitate to ask for more troops if he felt they were necessary.

He appeared at a rare joint news conference with U.S. Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad in the heavily fortified Green Zone in Baghdad. A power failure in the Green Zone briefly cut off the broadcast of the remarks.

“We are about 75 percent of the way through a three-step process in building those (Iraqi) forces. It is going to take another 12 to 18 months or so till I believe the Iraqi security forces are completely capable of taking over responsibility for their own security that’s still coupled with some level of support from us,” Casey said.

yahoo news

I think this is a bogus; there are no plans to bug out and it will take some some tool similiar to a dentist’s tooth extractor to remove the “permanent bases.”

Aknowledging that the “stay the timeline” is pure hype, I have to think that it is indicative that Rove et al. are trying to counter the negative public opinion on Iraq and the issue is definetely causing the rethugs some pain.

Disgraciamente Schumer, Biden, Billary etc. aren’t really interested in pulling out of the region either so whatever way the wind blows in November I’m sure I’ll still feel nauseous after I leave the voting booth.

4. marisacat - 24 October 2006

LOL Iraq will be an issue, nearly a repeat word for word of right now… but in ’08. I think it is like endlessly promising health care, but.

Grrreat campaign issue for both sides – depending.

Lotta fast rhetoric to smooth over the election just now. Co-Opt the Dems, what few words on Iraq they have finally developed… about it.

5. TustonDAZ - 24 October 2006

Iraq will be an issue, nearly a repeat word for word of right now… but in ‘08

Yeah, I think we can all figure that one out, even those of us without chickens to filet for auguries…

6. Ezekiel - 24 October 2006

Robert Parry makes an important cautionary point:

As Democrats go through their biennial rite of premature victory celebrations, they are inviting defeat again by obsessing on polls about how many congressional seats are “in play” rather than on explaining to the American people what a Republican victory on Nov. 7 would mean to the nation.

It’s remarkable how happy the Dems are to talk horse race this year when the issues are so critical. Oh well, Howard Fineman tells them they might win. I agree, Marisa. It does seem like an MSM setup.

7. JJB - 24 October 2006

I said right from the start of our Mesopotamian misadventure that it would be an issue through, at the very least, the Presidential election of 2012, and probably beyond. Nothing that’s happened since then has given me a reason to change my mind about that.

And much as I’d like to believe that we aren’t about to launch an attack on Iran, this Reuters story doesn’t give cause for optimism:

America’s civilian and military leaders in Iraq linked Iran and Syria with al Qaeda on Tuesday as forces trying to tear the country apart and prevent the United States from establishing a stable democracy.

The comments from ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad and General George Casey were among the strongest U.S. officials have leveled against Iraq’s two neighbors over alleged support for armed groups behind much of the bloodshed.

[snip]

“Those forces that constitute the extremist camp including not only al Qaeda but Iran and Syria are at work to keep us and the Iraqis from succeeding,” Khalilzad told a rare joint news conference with Casey, two weeks before U.S. Congressional elections.

“They fear Iraq’s success. They want to undermine our resolve by imposing costs on us in terms of prolonging the conflict, imposing casualties and creating the perception that Iraq cannot be stabilized,” Khalilzad said.

Mind you, what Reuters considered worthy of the lede, the NY Times buried in the last paragraphs of the story. Their take on it emphasized a possible increase of US troops in Baghdad, and says the press conference was intended mostly to smooth over differences between BushCo. and the Iraqi “government” with regards to dealing with the violence no one dares call a civil war. Still, there is this interesting little nugget once the Times does finally get around to mentioning the strong language directed at Syria and Iran:

Today’s news conference in the heavily defended government Green Zone was briefly interrupted by a power outage. [There's some of that success the Iranians and Syrians are so afraid of. -- JJB] During the session, both men spoke scathingly of Iran and Syria, who they said were working to provoke instability.

Mr. Khalilzad lumped the two countries together with Al Qaeda as “the enemies of Iraq.”

By contrast, they referred to the Sunni insurgents who until recently have been the main source of attacks on American troops in more measured terms, calling them “the resistance,” and drawing a distinction between them and “terrorists and extremists” described by Mr. Khalilzad.

General Casey called them “the Sunnis who fight us and claim to be the honorable resistance of Iraq,” and said that American officials have begun talking with them, along with the Iraqi government.

Here’s AP’s story via Newsday, which doesn’t make much of a possible increase in the US troops in Baghdad, instead leding with the ridiculous claim that the Iraqi government might realistically be able to field security forces that will control the country within 12-18 months, as does this story in the WaPo. I notice that both the BBC and Guardian stories are also emphasizing the “12-18 Months And All Will Be Well!” Maybe I’m wrong, but I get the feeling that Reuters is the only outlet to concentrate on what was really important about this Panic Presser.

8. marisacat - 24 October 2006

I think Iraq was always part of the 25 – 50 – 100 year plan. People at Kos used to sagely post “WE will be there for 10 years” and I’d post right beneath:

10 x 10.

So is the former Yugoslavia, same long range plan for a form of occupation. Just smaller and quieter, less bloody. We are not leaving Iraq… never were going to leave Iraq. Not willingly.

Most of the current sloberation is to co opt what little rhetoric the Dems have cobbled together.

9. JJB - 24 October 2006
10. marisacat - 24 October 2006

also in line with JJB is this from Danny Schechter

HOW TO END THE WAR?

The Sunday Times in London said yesterday that President Bush wants a “a good ending” as if the decision to leave has been made.. The headline in the weekend edition of the Guardian carries as its lead headline, “IRAQ MAYHEM LAUCHES HUNT FOR EXIT STRATEGY IN US AND UK.”

Both papers speak of “options” as the British Foreign Office is said to urge “engagement” with Syria and Iran to find a way out. The International Herald Tribune, published in Baghdad speaks of the U.S. military being “disheartened” by its failure to restore order. General William Westmoreland, ooops, make that Caldwell has called for “refocus.”

(That is if the goal is really to restore order rather than instigate chaos as a way of creating a pretext for the country’s dismemberment.

Does anyone else remember the famous slip of the tongue by the late Chicago Mayor Richard Daley, the first, who said during the riots of 1968 that the police were there to “create disorder.”

Don’t laugh—W seems to be finally acknowledging a historical comparison between the Iraq War and Vietnam after his Neo Con mates have spent years denying it.)

11. CSTAR - 24 October 2006

Re The Chris Hedges piece.

It’s very saddening to read the comments. It reminds me of the comments to Gideon Levy in Haaretz during the Israel-Lebanon war. My emotional reaction was then (and is now) not of anger, but of distress and sadness.

12. marisacat - 24 October 2006

CSTAR … agree. The comments were depressing.

13. TustonDAZ - 24 October 2006

I’ve been known to go back to something I’ve written to correct grammar or fix a broken link without noting it, but to make major redactions or change a story/diary name without mentioning that you’ve done it is dishonest…

Well the Eternal Hype link that Cactus Ed quotes (as well as the CT link from my “serious prediction comment”) has switched titles from
“Gullible Kossacks make asses of themselves” to “Accuracy at Daily Kos.”

No note of the change is made in the story, and maybe I’m nitpicking but even the smallest things have significance, and like all the shyte shoveled around there can’t cover up any the overwhelming evidence of fraud perpetuated on the gullible (and I ain’t talkin’ bout the folks wearin’ tinfoil)

14. JJB - 24 October 2006

MCat,

Hmmmmmm . . . .

Something tells me that yesterday’s visit wasn’t the first one IOZ has made to Big Orange Slop. I detect the sly wit of someone who’s been banned by one or the other of the FP thugs. I wonder who it is? Very good analysis of what he/she read, however, and also very judicious of him/her not to shoot ducks in a barrell by quoting the extraordinarily embarrassing material that lay about the comment thread. nyceve’s effusions were material enough to make the point.

That post in the comment thread came out of left field with its Henry Wallace reference, I must say. Maybe it was intended as a rhetorical tribute to the man who once declaimed “[n]ew horizons beckon with meaningful opportunities.” Saying that HW was VP for 4 years says nothing beyond stating a historical fact. It’s either a good, bad, or indifferent thing, depending on your political views, and the reactionary, drunken, racist Cactus Jack Garner was VP for 8 years during FDR’s first two terms, so what’s the point?

I’ve always had mixed feelings about Wallace. He was certainly naive about Stalin. Then again, he was just about the only prominent post-war US politician to question whether propping up regimes in league with and often controlled by gangsters in countries like Italy, Greece, Turkey, South Korea, and Japan had anything to do with supporting democracy or serving long-term US interests. He was loathed by Big Business, which saw to it that the post of Secretary of Commerce lost a great deal of its power when he was given that post after he swallowed his pride and agreed not to make waves over stepping aside as Vice President. And since I provided a rather silly quote to poke fun at him earlier, here’s another that’s quite perceptive, and has particular resonance for the US today: “The American fascist would prefer not to use violence. His method is to poison the channels of public information.”

15. bayprairie - 24 October 2006

blogging ethics principle — never delete: add updates, use strikethroughs, post follow-ups, but never delete.

16. Arcturus - 24 October 2006

In that confusion of verb tenses you find the abject failure of the dreaming insurgents

That’s a very perceptive post – thx for the pointer.

I take it the Mackey quotes didn’t do much for ya?

Came across this yesterday. “Genocide” may or may not be the apt term – at a certain point I’m not so sure the words matter:

The Cucapa and Kiliwa indigenous communities are facing extinction. Of the Cucapas, less then 300 remain; of the Kiliwas, 54.
. . .
In protest against the forceful dispossession of their lands and the destruction of their culture, the Kiliwas took a death pact. The women have agreed to stop having children, and the Kiliwas will die with this generation.

I’m not putting much stock in all the ‘exit strategy’ talk, but would love to be wrong. At this point, even a retreat to the mega-bases would be an improvement. That they are finally distinguishing the Sunni insurgents from ‘al qaeda’ might give some small cause for hope tho.

Absolutely agreed about the long-term view of these conflicts – & Iran & the Caucasus belong in that mix as well as Iraq & Yugoslvaia – not to mention positioning in Central Asia. So long as ‘our guys’ aren’t dieing, we like to fool ourselves into thinking we’re at peace (recalling BM’s praise of the ‘peaceful Clinton’ years in an exchange w/ me once), as if economic & covert warfare had no effect in the wolrd, or didn’t kill people those infamous ‘levers of diplomacy’).

JJB: do you know what year that Wallace quote is from?

17. JJB - 24 October 2006

Tuston,

Thanks for pointing that out. Changing the title that way makes a hell of a difference, doesn’t it? And how could it possibly be off the recommended list when it has far more recommends than most of what’s there currently? I wonder if the author changed the title, judging from some very truculent comments at the end of the thread, I suspect someone else did.

18. Arcturus - 24 October 2006

In that confusion of verb tenses you find the abject failure of the dreaming insurgents

That’s a very perceptive post – thx for the pointer.

I take it the Mackey quotes didn’t do much for ya?

Came across this yesterday. “Genocide” may or may not be the apt term – at a certain point I’m not so sure the words matter:

The Cucapa and Kiliwa indigenous communities are facing extinction. Of the Cucapas, less then 300 remain; of the Kiliwas, 54.
. . .
In protest against the forceful dispossession of their lands and the destruction of their culture, the Kiliwas took a death pact. The women have agreed to stop having children, and the Kiliwas will die with this generation.

I’m not putting much stock in all the ‘exit strategy’ talk, but would love to be wrong. At this point, even a retreat to the mega-bases would be an improvement. That they are finally distinguishing the Sunni insurgents from ‘al qaeda’ might give some small cause for hope tho.

Absolutely agreed about the long-term view of these conflicts – & Iran & the Caucasus belong in that mix as well as Iraq & Yugoslavia – not to mention positioning in Central Asia. So long as ‘our guys’ aren’t dieing, we like to fool ourselves into thinking we’re at peace (recalling BM’s praise of the ‘peaceful Clinton’ years in an exchange w/ me once), as if economic & covert warfare had no effect in the wolrd, or didn’t kill people those infamous ‘levers of diplomacy’).

19. Arcturus - 24 October 2006

testing . . .

20. christian - 24 October 2006

thank you so much kos for making sure we didn’t have to read that diary title. thank you so much for understanding us better than we do ourselves. please oh kos, help me. help me. and thank you again.

21. Arcturus - 24 October 2006

odd, I’ll try again.

In that confusion of verb tenses you find the abject failure of the dreaming insurgents

That’s a very perceptive post – thx for the pointer.

(also loved this: “The takeback they have in mind is simply to take back a place at the trough for their office-seeking snouts. So the wish-fulfilment dream of the troops, and the unconscious self-revelation of the pols, dovetail in one of those beautiful, overdetermined conjunctures that nobody could ever have designed.”)

I take it the Mackey quotes didn’t do much for ya?

Came across this yesterday. “Genocide” may or may not be the apt term – at a certain point I’m not so sure the words matter:

The Cucapa and Kiliwa indigenous communities are facing extinction. Of the Cucapas, less then 300 remain; of the Kiliwas, 54.
. . .
In protest against the forceful dispossession of their lands and the destruction of their culture, the Kiliwas took a death pact. The women have agreed to stop having children, and the Kiliwas will die with this generation.

I’m not putting much stock in all the ‘exit strategy’ talk, but would love to be wrong. At this point, even a retreat to the mega-bases would be an improvement. That they are finally distinguishing the Sunni insurgents from ‘al qaeda’ might give some small cause for hope tho.

Absolutely agreed about the long-term view of these conflicts – & Iran & the Caucasus belong in that mix as well as Iraq & Yugoslavia – not to mention positioning in Central Asia. So long as ‘our guys’ aren’t dieing, we like to fool ourselves into thinking we’re at peace (recalling BM’s praise of the ‘peaceful Clinton’ years in an exchange w/ me once), as if economic & covert warfare had no effect in the wolrd, or didn’t kill people those infamous ‘levers of diplomacy’).

22. Arcturus - 24 October 2006

are posts w/ links being moderated now? for some reason, I can’t post

23. marisacat - 24 October 2006

Arcturus… really sorry. They were in Spam.

Which they should not be, weeks ago I changed the default on links, raising the number allowed for a known commenter to high enough number to keep almost any comment from going to Spam.

But also, in the last three weeks I now get up to 300 spam comments a day.

The filters on WordPress may be over whelmed.

Sorry. Also I took the site off full moderation about 3 hours ago.

Sorry again..

24. Arcturus - 24 October 2006

No need to apologize to moi. I think I owe you one for the triple-post.

25. IOZ - 24 October 2006

marisacat: Thanks so much for the link. I’m enjoying your site; this is my first visit.

Arcturus: thank’s for the compliment. Do you know the poem “The Mind Is an Ancient and Famous Capital” by Delmore Schwartz? It involves your sn in a lovely closing line.

JJB: This was indeed my first real trip to Kos in quite some time, spurred on by some email correspondents who kept asking me to make fun of the fellow. I thought I might try to make a point while I made fun.

26. marisacat - 24 October 2006

Hello IOZ… ;)

As no doubt you know, you are linked elsewhere too… and it was Madman at LSF who began sending me links to you a few weeks ago.

I absolutely enjoy your site…

27. JJB - 24 October 2006

IOZ,

Hello and welcome! And whether that was your first visit, or the ten-thousandth, it was a very good takedown.

28. Arcturus - 24 October 2006

Ok, IOZ, I’m impressed by anyone who’d cite the author of “In Dreams Begin Responsibilities” (which come to think o it might deserve a re-read these days). I first used the sn in a short-lived poetry printing project & have a slew of citations from Hesiod through Zukofsky (& beyond), but the DS escaped me. Many thanks! & it looks like you’ve gained another reader as well . . .

29. fladem - 24 October 2006

Here’s how clueless I am – I don’t know why Kos banned Marisacat.

Anyway, does anyone have this strange sinking feeling about the Democrats?

30. bayprairie - 24 October 2006

JJB says;

Changing the title that way makes a hell of a difference, doesn’t it? And how could it possibly be off the recommended list when it has far more recommends than most of what’s there currently?

it was on the recommended last night or early a.m. i noted it also, under the old title, and was rolling my eyes rat the text cactus ed blockquoted.

the little sniglet i quoted above (before rushing off to the dentist AHHH) concerning blog ethics i believe i got from mediagirl during an email discussion several of us were having some time ago. i’ve since taken it to heart and use it as a go-by. i do agree that minor changes in the sense of typographical corrections are certainly permissible. adjusting a mispelling, correcting a comma, things of that nature.

i personally feel that changing the headline completely should be noted at the bottom of the post.

31. Madman in the Marketplace - 24 October 2006

I saw a thing w/ Gelb about partitioning Iraq with a fawning Soledad O’Brian on CNN last week. They put up an interesting map (which I’ve been unable to find a link to) of a Kurdish north, a Shi’a southeast, a Sunni Northwest, and a big area called “Iraq” in the southwest (nearly the entire area south of the Euphrates). Home of new megabases, hmmmmm?

32. Meteor Blades - 24 October 2006

For the record, the algorithm for recommended diaries at Daily Kos gives more emphasis to new recommends. In other words, as recommends “age,” they carry less recommending clout. Otherwise, a diary with, say, 700 recommends would stay on the top of the list until another with the same number replaced it, and these are relatively rare. Thus, it is no surprise that a diary that receives 50 or so recommends within a few minutes of being posted may move quickly to the middle or even the top of the recommended list, while one with several hundred recommends dating back eight or ten hours will drop off the list.

Carry on.

33. christian - 24 October 2006

btw, there’s amazing new feud on at dk as the kos finds himself again tripping over his own tongue and ego but this time the herd is not flaggellating themselves at the master’s feet…

it’s clear that markos is a sociopath…

“Ok apparantly (0 / 0)
we must find Kos to be right all of the time or we get the dreaded troll”

34. christian - 24 October 2006

“Ok apparantly (0 / 0)
we must find Kos to be right all of the time or we get the dreaded troll”

kos is in trouble over his petulant inaccurate “fuck you john kerry” diary. the herd is letting him have it.

but it’s clear that markos is a sociopath.

35. CSTAR - 24 October 2006

It begins with bagpipes and bagpipers in full kilt regalia. A crowd follows with signs, clapping and cheering. At 0:19 seconds, what appears to be a large crucifix passes, carried by someone in the crowd.

IOZ, at first glance (I’m always distracted) I thought you were giving a stylized description of the site. There is indeed a lot of clapping and cheering there; the passing crucifix seemed to be a metaphorical reference to Pastor what’s-his-name.

36. marisacat - 24 October 2006

I just found 6 comments in Spam… and let them out.

Sorry!!

I am beginning to think the Word Press filters are overwhelmed, from the volume of real spam I have picked up.

37. marisacat - 24 October 2006

Hello Fladem!

Re The Democrats:

I think we are still trapped in that world described bakc in ’00… we are like a nickel spinning on the edge of a table top… And that 50/50 tension would have been the story in ’00 but for Florida, Bush V Gore and whatever else. Oh pregnat chads.. ;).

38. TustonDAZ - 24 October 2006

Yah mon! Babylon White Powder es puro diablo!

But Evo Morales es Santo!

Bolivian president Evo Morales recently implored the United Nations to give the coca leaf a new life. A former coca farmer himself, Morales asked the General Assembly to focus on coca’s possible future as the raw material for a lucrative consumer-goods industry—not its nefarious present, as the source of the international cocaine trade. “This is the coca leaf, it is green, and not white like cocaine,” Morales lectured, waving one limp little leaf at the hall of surprised dignitaries.

well, maybe not:

…Morales has reluctantly destroyed more acres of coca than his predecessors.

Still, I’ve got to tip my hat to el don verdadero for tryin':

While the Bush administration says he’s still not doing enough, Morales wants to double to 59,000 acres the amount of land that Bolivia set aside long ago to grow coca for legal uses. Armed with scientific studies, Bolivian officials are attacking the impression that coca itself is harmful to health. They argue that legal products could be a viable alternative to growing the plant for use in cocaine, and far more effective than trying to wipe out the hoja sagrada, or sacred leaf, that has been a staple of Andean daily life and religious rituals since ancient times.

Meantime, in the Andean countries of Bolivia, Peru and Colombia, dozens of businesses are developing new coca-based goods. In Bolivia, industrial production of coca tea began in the 1980s, and since 2000, small companies have put out some 30 different products—coca bread and pastas, toothpaste and shampoo, ointments, candies, liquors. The Morales government recently set aside $1 million to further develop legal coca products. One company now has a soft drink called “Evo Cola” in the works.

In Peru, the state coca company, Enaco, has been turning out local teas for years and is now expanding. Earlier this year Enaco closed a deal to export 153,000 packets of coca tea to South Africa (which never signed the U.N. convention). Enaco also sells coca leaves to private Peruvian companies, including a coca-cookie maker and an energy-drink company. Abroad, it supplies coca for use as an anesthetic in Japan and Belgium, and as a flavoring to Coca-Cola. An exception to the U.N. ban that many experts say was negotiated for Coca-Cola allows exports of coca from which certain active ingredients have been extracted. (Coca-Cola, which has long declined to discuss the “secret formula” for its signature soda, also declined to comment for this story.)

MSGE
Yeah, secret formula! Serious self-poisoners know that there is one legitimate US importer of of Coca-leaf (a park city, nj company that shall remain un-named) for extraction of cocaine for pharmeceutical use the rest if the extract is sold to coke…

In other fiending news it seems that somebody at Los Alamos has been speeding on the scourge d’ jour

Too bad Khat was made illegal her during the Somalia-what-ever-it-was…I’m willin’ to bet a coca-khat-cola soda would be quite stimulating.

From a purely rational perspective, I think the argument for the legalization of dilute forms “drugs” (e.g. evo cola) is hard to beat.

But then again, I’m biased

39. TustonDAZ - 24 October 2006
40. TustonDAZ - 24 October 2006

OMG! I just followed the link to Who is IOZ above…fucking brilliant!

I followed a link to a recommended “diary” entry titled “Gullible Kossacks make asses of themselves.” This sounds promising, I thought….

I believe the proper response is: Oh SNAP!

41. marisacat - 24 October 2006

Isn’t it a great posting, from Who is IOZ?

Wonderful writing too.
;)

42. Ezekiel - 24 October 2006

A highly respected historian/sociologist/political behaviorist recently wrote, “Americans love to win,” and there’s an interesting piece of commentary on the effects of that on Counterpunch.

A mother is upset about the way that “rah! rah!” football has permeated even the ivied halls of Macalester College with the result that her son has been kicked off the team for failing to remove his helmet during the opening “God bless America” ceremonies. She also recounts how school officials went to ridiculous lengths to manipulate the local press so they could control the story.

Her point is that the “winner take all” religion of America is eating her young and that of other countries too–the former through punishing those who step out of line and the latter more viciously with bombs and bullets.

(One irony: she begins the piece by citing all of Macalester’s USNWR glory)

I liked her close which includes a quote from a song with which this aging boomer isn’t familiar:

In these times, when Empire’s fictions and cover-ups come to kick down your door, you just know your life is about to change.

“America as often been called the land of opportunity
But you better be careful which one you choose cuz it might come with a penalty
There’s lots of good jobs working in a factory cranking out the land mines
And you better be ready to pull the party line or you’ll end up doing real time

America has her finger on the trigger
America’s got her bullets in the gun
America’s still stringing up niggers
America eats her young . . .”

‘America Eats Her Young’ , Dayglo Abortion (2004)

43. D. Throat - 25 October 2006

So I guess that is why M. Beard’s diary on Chevron and the California GOP disappeared so quickly….

44. Ezekiel - 25 October 2006

Keep on clapping!

One of the more obnoxious blogmaids jumps on a diarist for the title, “Face It, Folks, the Democrats Could Lose (Unless We Can Get Out the Vote).”

My suggestion? (14+ / 0-)

Recommended by:
Philosopher, StephNW4Clark, tlh lib, Nathaniel Ament Stone, admiralh, churchylafemme, tabbycat in tenn, Elise, jorndorff, begone, debedb, FireCrow, Mishima, CenterLeft

Change the title of this diary.

Michael Steele

by BarbinMD on Tue Oct 24, 2006 at 10:52:15 PM PDT

[ Reply to This |Recommend ]

*
I know you’re in it for shock value (5+ / 0-)

Recommended by:
Philosopher, tlh lib, admiralh, BarbinMD, Elise

but now is the time for solidarity and positive momentum, not fake shock bombs.

We’ve got the Republican party for that.

by StephNW4Clark on Tue Oct 24, 2006 at 10:56:22 PM PDT

[ Parent | Reply to This |Recommend ]
o
Yeah, I know. It’s pretty trollish… (1+ / 0-)

Recommended by:
gkn

…but unfortunately I think it’s going to be completely accurate, unless progressive–but lazy/busy/clueless–slobs like me get off our asses in the immediate run-up to the election and volunteer.

Tell you what, though: I’ll change the title as soon as I get 10 good suggestions.

by StupidAsshole on Tue Oct 24, 2006 at 11:04:11 PM PDT

[ Parent | Reply to This |Recommend ]
+
We’re all going to die today (8+ / 0-)

Recommended by:
Philosopher, tlh lib, hhex65, Elise, jorndorff, begone, occams hatchet, tonyfv

…unless we continue to breathe. Totally accurate.

You could have gone with any number of titles.

GOTV Vital For Victory On November 7th
GOTV Key To Victory On November 7th
We Must GOTV To Win On November 7th
Working To GOTV On November 7th

And so on…

Michael Steele

by BarbinMD on Tue Oct 24, 2006 at 11:09:14 PM PDT

[ Parent | Reply to This |Recommend ]


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