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War over tits… 21 July 2008

Posted by marisacat in 2008 Election, Afghanistan War, DC Politics, Inconvenient Voice of the Voter, Iraq War, Israel/AIPAC, Pakistan, WAR!.
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tits
photo: BBC

All that hot sweaty bother. After 4 years, an appeals court has decided to toss the fine levied on CBS for the quick flash of Janet Jackson’s right tit…

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. government’s campaign against television indecency was dealt a blow on Monday when a court overturned a $550,000 fine against CBS Corp television stations for airing a glimpse of pop singer Janet Jackson’s breast during the 2004 Super Bowl broadcast.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit said the Federal Communications Commission had “arbitrarily and capriciously departed from its prior policy” that exempted fleeting broadcast material from actionable indecency violations.

Four years? Think they will be ending any war, anywhere?, anytime? When consideration of a brief flash of breast took 4 years?

There were a couple of interesting aspects back when it happened… it was, not readily apparent in the above photo, a real, un-enhanced breast. And, I figured right away that Alabama lit up like a cranky christian christmas tree at the sight of her flower design pastie. Must’ve driven them crazy. IIRC that is one of the states that bans sex toys. I-L-L-E-G-A-L. If only they’d ban Jeeeeeeeeeeeesuhs. But tassel decorated pasties, I am sure, are the Great Evil in Alabama.

**********

Other than that, I suggest we call him Barack of AfPak. Or, maybe, Barack of the Whirled.

SPIEGEL: Critics say the trip is nothing but a PR stunt to strengthen his foreign-policy credentials and that he has only rarely been to Europe before.

Rice: Senator Obama has travelled to Europe, Africa, the Middle East and South Asia many times before. He lived in Asia. He bows to nobody in his understanding of this world.

My, but these people are ahead of themselves. The Fall, when it comes, should be interesting.

They are careful to advertise continuing war, at all times:

Rice: Obama’s view is that circumstances in Pakistan and Afghanistan pose the most dangerous threat to Europe and the US right now. Al-Qaida is regrouping and reconstituting their safe haven; the Taliban are gaining strength. Europe is closer to that threat than we are. Yet, we all have to take it very seriously. The US has to put more resources and troops into Afghanistan, and NATO should do the same, while — to the greatest extent possible — lifting operational restrictions.

He and his are so earnest. It is just gagworthy.

The interview Lara Logan did with Obama * is being picked apart here and there, but this at the close still blows me away, a day later:

Logan: OK, last question. There is a perception that you lack experience in world affairs.

Obama: Right.

Logan: Is this trip partly aimed at overcoming that perception that, you know, there is doubt among some Americans that you could lead a country at war as commander in chief from day one?

Obama: You know, the interesting thing is that the people who are very experienced in foreign affairs I don’t think have those doubts. The troops that I’ve been meeting with over the last several days, they don’t seem to have those doubts.
So the objective of this trip was to have substantive discussions with people like President Karzai or Prime Minister Maliki or President Sarkozy or others who I expect to be dealing with over the next eight to 10 years.
And it’s important for me to have a relationship with them early, that I start listening to them now, getting a sense of what their interests and concerns are.
Because one of the shifts in foreign policy that I want to execute as president is giving the world a clear message that America intends to continue to show leadership but our style of leadership is going to be less unilateral, that we’re going to see our role as building partnerships around the world that are of mutual interest to the parties involved.
And I think this gives me a head start in that process.

Logan: Do you have any doubts?

Obama: Never.

He will direct us, re double us, in our war efforts to the geographical location that sinks empires. And he will be fearless in that act.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

* Until it popped up, via Google, ahead of the CBS transcript of Lara Logan, I had no idea there was a Fox News coin called “Major Garrett’s Bourbon Room”. So reeks of the Old Confederacy, doesn’t it? Reminds me of the slices of pecan pie in Georgia, they were divine, crushed pecans forming the crust, and not some slosh of a jelly masquerading as pecan filling, thick with pecan, thru and thru… But riding atop thoe pie slices … often a little paper Confederate Flag… And nearby a rendering of that near religious myth, Grant surrendering to Lee.

Not to worry! Pulling the level for Barack of AfPak will wipe all that messiness away. Forever.

***************

Couple of comments that were at the end of the last thread:

NYCee

Last Saturday I was brunching on a bunch of these pieces from the Black Agenda Report’s Obama File. There were a lot of cogent and pungent morsels within. One I found, The Audacity of Imperial Airbrushing: Barack Obama’s Whitewashed History of U.S. Foreign Policy, by Paul Street, is excellent – truly deserving of a full read and worth the time taken.

He pulls a chain of our government’s imperialist dirty deeds from the memory hole (Think a briefer strain of Stephen Kinzer’s Overthrow: America’s Century of Regime Change from Hawaii to Iraq ) and deftly weaves in the words of our “progressive” change agent extraordinare, Candidate Obama, exposing his foreign policy take as less than refreshing or reassuring or new direction.

So what makes it so sparkling, then, so newer than nouvelle cuisine, when served up by Obama?

The saying, presentation is everything, comes to mind.

*** close of NYCee comment ***

AND

bayprairie

McCain and Obama Agree to Attend Megachurch Forum

It has taken a man of God, perhaps, to do what nobody else has been able to do since the general election season began: Get Barack Obama and John McCain together on the same stage before their party conventions later this summer.

The Rev. Rick Warren has persuaded the candidates to attend a forum at his Saddleback Church, in Lake Forest, Calif., on Aug. 16. In an interview, Mr. Warren said over the weekend that the presidential candidates would appear together for a moment but that he would interview them in succession at his megachurch.

:::snip:::

He (warren) said that both had readily agreed, perhaps reflecting how each candidate is courting the evangelical audience to whom Mr. Warren ministers.

The F-Word

…Rick Warren, Joel Osteen, and the business-friendly fundamentalism of the post-Christian Right era don’t set off liberal alarms the way the pulpit pounders such as John Hagee, Pat Robertson, and James Dobson do. The irony is that the agenda of this new lifestyle evangelicalism is more far-reaching than that of the traditional Christian Right: the Christian Right wanted a seat at the table; lifestyle evangelicalism wants to build the table. It wants to set the very terms in which we imagine what’s possible, and to that end it dispenses with terms that might scare off liberals. It’s big tent fundamentalism – everybody in.

But the ultimate goals remain the same. True, Osteen steers clear of abortion for the most part, and Warren, every bit as opposed to homosexuality as Jerry Falwell was, prefers to talk about AIDS relief. But both men — and the new evangelicalism as a movement — continue to preach the merger of Christianity and capitalism pioneered three quarters of a century ago. On the surface, it’s self-help; scratch, and it’s revealed as a profoundly conservative ideology that conflates church and state, scripture and currency, faith and finance…

*** close of bayprairie comment ***

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Comments»

1. Madman in the Marketplace - 21 July 2008

Rick Warren, Joel Osteen, and the business-friendly fundamentalism of the post-Christian Right era don’t set off liberal alarms the way the pulpit pounders such as John Hagee, Pat Robertson, and James Dobson do.

They’ve set off this lefty’s alarms for many years. They are the natural outgrowth of the effectiveness of the previous generation’s nuttery. It’s the logical next step in that “movement”, to lock in their political movement into real material wealth. Sorta like the Catholics did as they grew back in the beginning.

2. Madman in the Marketplace - 21 July 2008

Kokesh on Conyers:

I got the impression that Conyers is going senile. If he really thinks as slow as he talks, we’re in a lot of trouble. Most of his staff seem to be in favor of impeachment and are just waiting for the word. A couple of them even thanked us for being there and being so strong in our convictions. For a long time, Pelosi has been saying that impeachment is “off the table” and has obeyed every command from the administration, so it’s safe to say that they have her by the balls. She bought the speakership by raising money for her fellow Democrats, and there have got to be a lot of financial skeletons in her closet. The only question is, has Pelosi actually convinced him that impeachment isn’t strategically wise, or is someone threatening him? I wouldn’t put it past Bush’s cronies to even go after his family.

He told us at that meeting that he wanted to meet with us again on July 25th. We were pretty pissed to put it mildly. More run around from another spineless Democrat. More posturing from this sorry excuse for an opposition party. Don’t they get it that when we can see through their BS so easily it doesn’t work? Remember the country having a good laugh when Clinton and Obama made nice in Unity, New Hampshire? If there was a city named Obvious Crude Political Calculation, it would be overrun by Democrats. I really hope they don’t keep control of the Congress.

Conyers canceled that meeting with us to announce that his committee will be holding a hearing that day on “the Imperial Presidency of George W. Bush and possible legal responses.” That’s like someone who is getting robbed at gun point calling their Mom to discuss calling the cops. Does he really think that this is going to make the Democrats look good? I hope he is aware that after writing impeachment articles for Nixon, his party had a sweeping electoral victory. Likewise for the Republicans with Clinton.

The press release (below) brags about all of the violations of the Constitution by this administration that the judiciary committee has “conducted extensive oversight into.” Basically, “Yes, we’re keeping track of how bad we’re getting screwed.” He presented us with an even more extensive list of things the committee has looked into at our last meeting, as if it would appease us. Of course, they have failed to do anything about any of them. What’s the point of oversight if you don’t do anything when you discover a crime has been committed?

This is too disgusting for words. I want to vomit. I will be there on the 25th anyway to continue to push for impeachment, but I’m not holding my breath, and I’ll have to hold my nose. Of course, the ultimate reason that our government is corrupt is because our culture is corrupt. If we held our representatives in Congress accountable, they might be inclined to hold the President accountable. But then, if we were paying attention, and doing our duty as citizens, we wouldn’t have Bush for a president in the first place.

Bingo.

3. Madman in the Marketplace - 21 July 2008

IRAQ: Fallujah Braces for Another Assault By Ali al-Fadhily and Dahr Jamail

FALLUJAH, Jul 21 (IPS) – U.S. and Iraqi forces are preparing another siege of Fallujah under the pretext of combating “terror”, residents and officials say.

Located 69 km west of Baghdad, the city that suffered two devastating U.S. attacks in 2004 has watched security degrade over recent months.

“Ruling powers in the city fighting to gain full control seem willing to use the security collapse to accuse each other of either conspiracy (in lawlessness) or incapability of control,” Sufian Ahmed, a lawyer and human rights activist in Fallujah told IPS.

“They suddenly changed their tone from saying that the city was the safest in Iraq to claiming that al-Qaeda is a serious threat. Fallujah residents know their so-called leaders are using security threats to terrify them for their own political interests.”

In the face of U.S. military claims of improved security, violence has been rising by the day this month. The city has now been placed under tight curfew while U.S. and Iraqi military forces prepare for a new offensive, according to the local Azzaman daily.

Iraqi security forces have established new checkpoints around the city and are forbidding movement of people and traffic. Pick-up trucks are roaming the city warning residents that al-Qaeda has once again infiltrated Fallujah.

Iraqi police officers insist that the situation is under control despite the “occasional incidents that take place all over Iraq.”

The indications on the ground belie these claims. “The Americans and their allies transferred our leader, Colonel Fayssal al-Zoba’i from his post because they have bad plans for the city,” a major in the Fallujah police force told IPS. “He has all the right to keep his post because he was the one who led us to defeat the insurgency while the Americans failed. They (the U.S. military) seem to have a plan to destroy the city again.”

4. marisacat - 21 July 2008

I got the impression that Conyers is going senile.

yeah I had that same impression, couple of years ago… at pressers he would ramble. Talk about himself, drift. All about him, when you come down to it……… Just years of not having to do ANYTHING, able to whine and moan and collect their pay.

5. Madman in the Marketplace - 21 July 2008

story including a list of people appearing before Conyer’s “Justice” cmte.

6. Madman in the Marketplace - 21 July 2008

Need a break from the horror?

How not to do an American accent

Her work involves building the accent authentically by teaching the real mouth shapes and tongue positions involved – for a general American accent, she tells me, that means a wide mouth and the tongue higher up in the mouth.

She also tells me to smile, in order to place the voice towards my nasal resonator – one of the three voice resonators along with the facial and throat resonators. Berkery describes learning to do an accent as having “a mask on the face that fits perfectly”.

With my lifted tongue, wide mouth, attempted smile, and the concentration involved in maintaining these as we start voice exercises, my mask resembles something like Jack Nicholson’s The Joker with a lobotomised, vacant look in the eyes. I feel certain that a cinema audience would find it distracting.

Berkery takes me through some of the major vowel changes from standard English to general American – their short “ah” in bath and sample, the “aw” in cloth and Boston – and the sound that comes out of my mouth is unrecognisable to me.

The first comment:

What a great story. It never occurs to us that there is such a thing as an American accent. This video was a lot of fun for a Texan to watch. Had no idea it was so difficult.
Steve Hoxworth, Laredo, Texas U.S.A.

Because it never occurs to most of us that America isn’t the center of the universe.

7. Madman in the Marketplace - 21 July 2008
8. Madman in the Marketplace - 21 July 2008

Protesting HCR 362 at Nancy Pelosi’s House

Over 100 San Francisco antiwar activists protested against the Iran blockade bill, HCR 362, at Nancy Pelosi’s house on Saturday. The protest was emotional, and three people were arrested for trespassing.

9. Madman in the Marketplace - 21 July 2008

The Democrats are the Real Problem

Obama’s candidacy is over; kaput. He’s already stated that he has no intention of stopping the war, so he has disqualified himself. That’s his prerogative; no one put a gun to his head. His op-ed in Monday’s New York Times just removes any lingering doubt about the matter. What Obama proposes is moving the central theater of operation from Iraq to Afghanistan. Big deal. Why is it more acceptable to kill a man who is fighting for his country in Afghanistan than in Iraq?

It’s not; which is why Obama must be defeated and the equivocating Democratic Party must be jettisoned altogether. The Democrats are a party of blood just like the Republicans, they’re just more discreet about it. That’s why people who are serious about ending the war have to support candidates outside the two-party charade. The Democrat/Republican duopoly will not deliver the goods; it’s as simple as that. The point is to stop the killing, not to provide blind support for smooth-talking politicos who try to mask their real intentions. Obama made his choice, now he can suffer the consequences.

Yup.

What leftist or progressive is not totally fed-up with the Democrats cagey “bait-and-switch” hypocrisy? Voting the Democratic ticket is not a sign of “hope”; it’s a sign of being a schmuck. The Democrats have done nothing to stop the war and will do nothing to stop the war. The Obama candidacy is merely a way to replace one group of genocidal maniacs with another. Who needs a charismatic, flannel-mouth glamor boy to lead us into battle when a senile fogy with “anger management” issues will do just fine.

Voters of conscience should reject that choice altogether. Just as they should reject the “lesser of two evils” theory which does not apply when ordinance is being dumped daily on innocent civilians. It has to stop.

Obama is not an antiwar candidate, that is merely a fiction maintained by his public relations team. In fact, he wants to beef up the military with 65,000 additional ground forces and 27,000 more marines. He’s also stated that he will add “two additional combat brigades to Afghanistan” and encourage NATO to make “greater contributions—with fewer restrictions”. In his op-ed he boasted, “As president, I will make the fight against Al Qaeda and the Taliban the top priority that it should be. This is a war that we have to win.”

It’s not just us.

10. Madman in the Marketplace - 21 July 2008

Impeachment is off the table because Nancy is an collaborator in the war crimes.

11. Heather-Rose Ryan - 21 July 2008

Bulletin from my garden, a.k.a. the Weed Jungle:

Bee balm

Hollyhock – yes it really IS practically black – when we picked it out, we thought it was a dark blue!

Unknown blue flower – can anyone name it? It just showed up this summer. I like it but I have no idea what it is.

Dragonfly

Shasta daisy

I’m trying to get pix of the hummingbirds, but they move too fast. Amusing to see them divebombing each other to get territorial rights over the feeder. They’re aggressive little things.

I’m having a great time ignoring the political scene. Tonight I’m looking through old cookbooks and making a garlic soup from a Jacques Pepin book. I’ve long been a fan of his, especially his beautiful hands. Bon appetit!

12. diane - 21 July 2008

Last thread:

Thanks for the note on Catnip, penlan!

11

That’s Borage, Heather. It’s a self-sowing annual herb, whose leaves taste of cucumber. Last I knew it was safe to eat (doesn’t freeze or dry suitably).

13. diane - 21 July 2008

Apologies if this has already been posted:

Fish Virus Feeds Fears It Will Spread to Mississippi River

By Kari Lydersen
Washington Post Staff Writer
Saturday, July 19, 2008; Page A02

CHICAGO — A deadly fish virus has been found for the first time in southern Lake Michigan and an inland Ohio reservoir, spurring fears of major fish kills and the virus’s possible migration to the Mississippi River.

The Illinois Department of Natural Resources invoked emergency fishing regulations June 30 to stop the spread of viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS), often described as “fish Ebola,” which was found in round gobies and rock bass tested at a marina near the Wisconsin border in early June…..

14. marisacat - 22 July 2008

11 – H-RH

If you manage a pic of a humming bird, please link to it…

A few weeks ago as we were heading into the 2,063 fires out here of June/July…. a local station invited viewers photos, there was a fire just south of the city, near the city border… anyway, one of the viewer photographers caught a night view of the fire with a hummingbird rising just in frotn of the camera. Amazing.

Have to shut down and reboot then will pull up your pics, thanks for posting them…..

BTW, Webb on with Rose, for the hour… just stumbled into it… Oh! Such a great guy (not)! war chat, war chat, war chat………

************

13 – diane

when in doubt, when the people prove resilient, poison the greatest river. I mean, you have to wonder.

15. marisacat - 22 July 2008

Webb is singing the prasies of the great populist democracy brought to this country by the Scottish kirk… and embodied in teh first administration of Andrew Jackson.

We are so fucking nuts.

16. lucid - 22 July 2008

13 – I’ve seen some strong circumstantial evidence linking hemorrhagic fevers [including Ebola] to cyanide and other mining chemicals. Exposure to mercurial cyanide is identical to hermorrhagic fever symptoms – and there is severe mining pollution in the areas in which these fevers take place.

I wonder if this was a spill of some kind.

17. bayprairie - 22 July 2008

im pretty sure i can guess which historical figure webb would really like to shower with hosannas. but hey, its a lost cause.

18. NYCee - 22 July 2008

Obama in Jordan/Press Conference

The sound wasnt up on the reporters, but I could tell by his answer that he was pinned on his “never” (have doubt) comment in the ABC interview that you highlighted, Marisa.

He did a little damage control, realizing how arrogant it sounded: Better to never say never, said he. Then he said no one can provide a “perfect” formula, but he has no doubt that he can apply the best solution/judgement, after hearing from all sides and applying the facts.

BESTest in the WESTest!

Also got a question (I couldnt hear) re the I/P conflict. Again, the heavy emphasis on Israel needing to feel secure, have a partner. I had to chuckle when he went on to say that each side needs to “look in the mirror.” The chuckle came when he gave an example of what that mirror would show to each side: The Palestinians would need to resolve their internal conflict (like the US-Israel hasnt milked that split, insisting the election result must be ignored and turned their way, ie, no Hamas, period.)
And the reflection for Israel, in the mirror? Well, (surprise, surprise!), there was none.

He started and ended with the Palestinians (surprise, surprise!) He only mentioned the word Israel as part of his instruction to the Palestinians, saying (surprise, surprise!), that the Palestinians had to (get rid of Hamas to) make Israel feel secure, feel that they have a partner they can work with… And their reason for doing nothing before Hamas was elected? That nice long stretch after Arafat died? (Another one they “couldnt” work with.)

(And the silly season, it goes round and round…)

Well, he looked good.

I hear King Abdullah told him that the next president has to pay attention to the conflict, help to resolve it in a “just” manner.

I look for the words “just” or “fair” in our pols when they talk about resolving this conflict. I rarely find them. I guess it’s just too slippery a slope from there to “evenhanded.” And anyone who paid attention during the Dean campaign knows what happens to anyone who utters the e-word (Nancy Pelosi sends in the clowns, wielding knives…)

19. NYCee - 22 July 2008
20. marisacat - 22 July 2008

NYCee

thanks for that………… I heard (think via The Page) that Abdullah used “evenhanded”… hmmm.

BTW, Couric interview with him tonight (Obama, I mean) Ambinder has up text snips from it…

http://marcambinder.theatlantic.com/

if anyone wants a preview. Does not come on here for 3.5 hours…

21. marisacat - 22 July 2008

LOL Cass Sunstein and Glenn Greenwald on Democracy NOW!:

CASS SUNSTEIN: Well, there has been a big debate among law professors and within the Supreme Court about the President’s adherent authority to wiretap people. And while I agree with Senator Feingold that the President’s position is wrong and the Supreme Court has recently, indirectly at least, given a very strong signal that the Supreme Court itself has rejected the Bush position, the idea that it’s an impeachable offense to adopt an incorrect interpretation of the President’s power, that, I think, is too far-reaching. There are people in the Clinton administration who share Bush’s view with respect to foreign surveillance. There are past attorney generals who suggested that the Bush administration position is right. So, I do think the Bush administration is wrong—let’s be very clear on that—but the notion that it’s an impeachable offense seems to me to distort the notion of what an impeachable offense is. That’s high crimes and misdemeanors. And an incorrect, even a badly incorrect, interpretation of the law is not impeachable.

hmm did not seem to stop the R, w/r/t MonicaGate.

22. marisacat - 22 July 2008

Just a little ahead of themselves, just a little

White House rules on Air Obama?

Carrie Budoff Brown reports from the flight from Amman to Tel Aviv:

Obama aides were reminded by reporters – for the second time today – that he isn’t in the White House yet, and therefore they can’t invoke White House rules and traditions.

An unpaid foreign policy adviser worked for Clinton) told reporters that he never, in his four years in the White House, had go on the record for a briefing. Several reporters retorted that they weren’t in the White House.

full text via Ben Smith, Politico, Budoff-Brown is on the press plane with ObRama.

23. marisacat - 22 July 2008

LOL It’s a crime! Cry to the heavens! Write your congressman!

Apparently the Denver convention is being called the AT&T Convention.

GLENN GREENWALD: Right. There are so many levels of the way in which that telecom money and corporate money floods the Congress. I mean, you have direct campaign contributions. And that study that you just described is incredibly insightful about the process. And right before Jay Rockefeller in the Senate became the most vocal advocate for telecom amnesty, huge amounts of telecom money poured into his campaign coffers. And in fact Wired magazine did a study showing that, prior to that, he received virtually no money, and right as telecom amnesty became a big issue, all sorts of telecom executives and companies poured money into his coffers, had campaign parties for him, created this connection, this social and financial connection. And he then became their greatest advocate.

On top of that, you have millions and millions and millions of dollars, as Mr. Weissman described, in lobbying fees from these telecom industries. And then you have the fact that they fund so many of the party apparatus that there’s almost very little separation between the party leadership and the telecom industry. And you see that in terms of how the Democratic Congress behave. I mean, a majority of them voted against telecom amnesty in the House, but far more than enough of them in the House and in the Senate voted in favor of it. And as you say, the ones who did have very strong connections to the telecom industry, in terms of contributions and lobbying.

Weisman goes on to talk about Liberal Lion Teddy and sucking up to Big Pharma money.

24. marisacat - 22 July 2008

LOL It is so helpful to have the reporter questions off mike…

OK, yes? Yes, sir. Go ahead, yes.

QUESTION: (OFF-MIKE)

OBAMA: Yes?

QUESTION: (OFF-MIKE)

OBAMA: Yes.

QUESTION: (OFF-MIKE)

OBAMA: Yes.

CNN has the transcript, such as it is. He gives long windy answers to unheard questions. Bravo Ob[fuscation] Team!

25. NYCee - 22 July 2008

#20

My pleasure.

Will have to check out the interview. Funny about the reminder by reporters to candidate Obama, about being “on the record” and not yet in the White House.

He does move gracefully, has the deep voice, and looks great compared to Bush or McCain or… well, take your pick from the Rs or Dems offered this election cycle (exempting Romney, for those who like the Sears & Roebuck, robe and pipe look :-) )

Oh, or the Edwards type.

But Obama looks good in that not-pipe-&-robe-or-campus-sweater-boy way.

He makes a good presentation, for sure. I have taken a reading and can report that the Swoon-O-Meter is close to breaking point today. :-)

26. NYCee - 22 July 2008

Yeah, the transcript has what I was referencing re the I/P mirror bit. It’s the second question on it, further down.

27. NYCee - 22 July 2008

Uh oh… saw this on the DK vine.

Looks like the Enquirer is at it again, insisting Edwards has a lover and a love child.

Hmm…

They are going pretty far out on a limb if this is false.

28. Madman in the Marketplace - 22 July 2008

Crooked Timber review of Perrin’s “Savage Mules”:

Savage Mules is a cracking read – I’m only half way through it, but for reasons I’ll get onto in a minute, I thought it made sense to post the review early. As the title suggests, it’s a book about the Democratic Party of the USA, and about their long history of violence, imperialism, authoritarianism and craven surrender to the worst excesses of American right-capitalism. As such, in the current media environment (which seems to be dominated by a suffocating mix of unquestioning idolatry from the left and half-baked smears from the right), it’s a tonic. Yes indeed, there do exist people in America who are prepared to criticise the Democrats from the Left!

And what a criticism. Reading “Savage Mules”, you realise what a sorry job Jonah Goldberg made of “Liberal Fascism”. From the Trail of Tears to the internment of Japanese-Americans to , if you actually want to stitch the Democratic Party up as a gang of authoritarians, nuts and genocidaires, there’s more than enough material available in the historic record for you to do so. The only thing is, that if you’re going to stitch the Democrats this way, it makes no sense to pretend that they’re socialists too.

In fact, (and this is pretty much a commonplace to everyone who doesn’t live in America), the Democratic Party are a right-wing capitalist party which is broadly favourable to the military-industrial state, and as a result, when they act like one. As Adolph Reed notes (via Dennis’ blog, and in an article that looks like it’s one to print out and reread every time Obama gives a stirring set-piece speech, to re-establish bearings), there’s something a bit dumb about being repeatedly “shocked” by Democratic moves to the right (most recently, that wiretapping thing); they happen so frequently and systematically that they can’t be explained away as “pragmatism” or “compromise”; the Dem leadership does these things because they want to.

Why is this? I think at base, Dennis’ real explanation is a structural one; in the rare “but seriously folks” moments in Savage Mules (which mainly concentrates on Democratic adventurism in foreign policy rather than domestic politics), he always seems to be moving in the direction of something not far off Marx’s analysis of imperialism and the view that the Democrats are simply, like the Republicans, an arm of the American ruling class. However, this isn’t really set out in detail (or at least, not in the first half of the book), and other chapters also deal with the “not wanting to look like a wimp” theory, the “scared of being redbaited” theory and the currently still fashionable “arrogant and unrealistic assessment of humanitarian benefits” theory – he’s particularly caustic, as is Reed, on the tendency of grad-school humanitarians like to play “let’s you and him fight” on a global scale and on the serried ranks of old farts who are always hanging round explaining that while the war that they opposed in their youth was a hideous exercise in imperial brutality, the current war being pursued now that they’ve passed draft age is a high-minded humanitarian crusade. He’s also caustic about nearly everything else.

29. marisacat - 22 July 2008

And what a criticism. Reading “Savage Mules”, you realise what a sorry job Jonah Goldberg made of “Liberal Fascism”.

LOL That’s because Lucianne’s little boy is goddamn fucking dumb.

I noticed Perrin refrenced the Publisher’s Weekly review of his book (he said they did not like it) but he snipped out their closing graf, an assessment of the author, which he said was spot-on.

Oh the travails of the book bizwhiz.

30. Madman in the Marketplace - 22 July 2008

Lousiana Police Electrocute Handcuffed Man in Grocery Store with 9 Tasers in 14 minutes (Two After He was Already Unconscious)

At 1:28 p.m. last Jan. 17, Baron “Scooter” Pikes was a healthy 21-year-old man. By 2:07 p.m., he was dead.

What happened in the 39 minutes in between–during which Pikes was handcuffed by local police and shocked nine times with a Taser device, while reportedly pleading for mercy–is now spawning fears of a political cover-up in this backwoods Louisiana lumber town infamous for backroom dealings.

Even more ominously, because Pikes was black and the officer who repeatedly Tasered him is white, racial tensions over the case are mounting in a place that’s just 40 miles from Jena, La. Jena is the site of the racially explosive prosecution of six black teenagers charged with beating a white youth that last year triggered one of the largest American civil rights demonstrations in decades. And in a bizarre coincidence, Pikes turns out to have been a first cousin of Mychal Bell, the lead defendant in the Jena 6 case.

That’s just the beginning. The backstory is fucking wacked. The level of inbreeding, corruption and stupidity in this country, especially backwaters like that, are just amazing.

31. diane - 22 July 2008

14 & 16

Can’t make up mind between vile intent, or the hushed up spill and mines, they’re both so plausible…

Supposedly, humans are unaffected by this disease, so supposedly, it’s a different form of Ebola than that of humans and apes (last I heard of Ebola, it was a gruesome incidence of chimps bleeding from all over their body)

My mind just hopped to anthrax, I’ve always thought it was either conveniently used for, or partially intended to further hone down being able to track communications. I recollect congress persons requesting electronic communication after that yet to be solved mystery. A letter (or a carrier pigeon ;0) )seems the last bastion of anonymous communication (if not physically intercepted). Certainly, one would be hard-pressed to find a phone booth, without a long search and the semi-anonymity of land lines seems to be becoming a quaint thing of the past – I really don’t understand why someone would choose a cell phone over a land line.

And then of course there was that Anthrax rumor (also plausible), about the first victim (his wife filed a lawsuit for neglect of the case) in Florida (they said he caught it from a stream on a fishing or camping trip if I recollect?). The rumor was, the victim, Sun photo editor Bob Stevens, had pics of George and another Yale Grad (illustrious career, now an ambassador, who reportedly has been tight with George for years) in a quaint boys club rite.

Interesting that American Media Center was forced to shut its multimillion-dollar building which Stevens worked in and which was fumigated by Ghouliani and buds LLC: BioOne (see: Giuliani Co. Cleaning Up Anthrax, so much money for our dear politicians to make off disasters), but when BioOne refused to hand over the cleanup data the building owner refused to pay. Tough break to the Ghoulers that time around.

Some more here: Former AMI building declared free of anthrax contamination

32. diane - 22 July 2008

30

bizarre coincidence

indeed….

33. marisacat - 22 July 2008

Whoever was behind the anthrax acts in October 2001 (and iirc all net works received tainted mail, as well as only Democratic congress people) was showing how far they would go. The most widespread, the most invasive (in a sense) Federal agency, the US Mail, was used. Whoever it was was saying we mean business.

34. diane - 22 July 2008

33

Yeah, NBC and Daschle were headlined and apparentlly Dr Mengele Frist was the Congressional Anthrax Doctor on Call (that must have been real comforting).

Would agree that the Post Office was the most invasive Federal Agency, but now sending a letter to someone you want to address grievances to seems far more private than any other options.

Shit, if I piss off someone who gives me the one hour run around about bogus charges at my ISP, they have my fuckin password right in front of them.

35. Madman in the Marketplace - 22 July 2008

Jonathan Turley: Obama Adviser Cass Sunstein Rejects Prosecution of “Non-Egregious” Bush Crimes

With many Democrats still fuming over the refusal of Democratic leaders like Speaker Nancy Pelosi to allow even impeachment hearings into detailed allegations of crimes by President Bush in office, close Obama adviser (and University of Chicago Law Professor) Cass Sunstein recently rejected the notion of prosecuting Bush officials for crimes such as torture and unlawful surveillance. After Sen. Obama’s unpopular vote on the FISA bill, it has triggered a blogger backlash — raising questions about the commitment of the Democrats to do anything other than taking office and reaping the benefits of power.

The exchange with Sunstein was detailed by The Nation’s Ari Melber. Melber wrote that Sunstein rejected any such prosecution:

Prosecuting government officials risks a “cycle” of criminalizing public service, [Sunstein] argued, and Democrats should avoid replicating retributive efforts like the impeachment of President Clinton — or even the “slight appearance” of it.

Sunstein did add that “egregious crimes should not be ignored,” according to one site, click here. It is entirely unclear what that means since some of us take the views that any crimes committed by the government are egregious. Those non-egregious crimes are precisely what worries many lawyers who were looking for a simple commitment to prosecute crimes committed by the government.

He gets to the heart of the matter:

The main concern with Sunstein’s reported comment is how well they fit within the obvious strategy of the Democratic party leaders: to block any prosecution of either President Bush or his aides for crimes while running on those crimes to maintain and expand their power in Washington. The missing component in this political calculus is, of course, a modicum of principle.

Here’s the problem about “avoiding appearances.” There seems ample evidence of crimes committed by this Administration, in my view. To avoid appearances would require avoiding acknowledgment of those alleged crimes: precisely what Attorney General Mukasey has been doing by refusing to answer simple legal questions about waterboarding.

How about this for an alternative? We will prosecute any criminal conduct that we find in any administration, including our own. Now, that doesn’t seem so hard. There is no sophistication or finesse needed. One need only to commit to carry out the rule of law.

36. Madman in the Marketplace - 22 July 2008

Jonathan Turley on Sunstein, in spam.

37. marisacat - 22 July 2008

I am not going back to look at the anthrax, but think it was several Democratic congress people, Daschle probably was in front of the camera lot (I recall he was a pain in the ass on Cspan during those days) as Minority then Majority Leader… LOL It/anthrax happened when they were in the majority. Which they promptly lost in November.

Oh those crafty government types. They get their message over.

By invasive, I meant the US Mail is EVERYWHERE. Little towns, cities, on planes, etc. Intensively everywhere..

It willb e interesting to see what more, if anything, comes out abut the anthrax event (in whcih afterall people died) over the next couple of decades.

My guess, very little.

38. Madman in the Marketplace - 22 July 2008

It was Daschle and Leahy. There is a link of all the targets at the link.

39. Madman in the Marketplace - 22 July 2008

I have a Jonathan Turley link that went into spam.

40. marisacat - 22 July 2008

sorry Madman! I was doing the second of five loads of laundry.

Whew!
;)

41. marisacat - 22 July 2008

I’ve used Sunstein at times in the past (depending if he said something I agreed with) but he is just unreliable now that he is FOO, Friend of Ob… there also is a Democracy Now link up therad, he was on with Glenn Greenwald.

42. diane - 22 July 2008

What a busy year that was…all those dominos …yeah, it likely will be long time, if the truth ever does come out…..

Speaking of which, have any of our brave candidates made a peep about unsealing the Presidential records…I thought the stench from that one was equal to the Anthrax, hardly a peep against it, and no time was wasted…..

43. diane - 22 July 2008

35

Prosecuting government officials risks a “cycle” of criminalizing public service,

fucking priceless…….

44. marisacat - 22 July 2008

which is the WINGER defense. Sunstein should be ashamed.

AND the wingers broaden it to “criminalising politics”.

Actually Glenn Greenwald got off some good responses to that scheisse…

45. wilfred - 22 July 2008

#27 Something smells here. If the Enquirer knew Edwards would be at that hotel why don’t they have video of it (and photos?). It makes no sense they wouldn’t videotape it for their website.

46. Madman in the Marketplace - 22 July 2008

they want to have the power the wingers built, simple as that.

to do “good”, of course.

47. wilfred - 22 July 2008

Lieberman proudly spoke at Rev. Hagee’s conference in Washington DC this week. What a guy…..

48. diane - 22 July 2008

Thanks for that comment marisa, it sent me off to read the interview

He sure nailed the Twilight zone of “Law” we’re living with:

…—we have a law in this country that says it is a felony offense, punishable by up to five years in prison and a $10,000 fine, to spy on Americans without the warrants required by law. We have a president who got caught doing that, who admits that he did that. And yet, you have people saying, “Well, there may be legal excuses as to why he did that.” Or you have a president who admits ordering, in the White House, planning with his top aides, interrogation policies that the International Red Cross says are categorically torture, which are also felony offenses in the United States. And you have people saying, “Well, we can’t criminalize policy disputes.”

And what this has really done is it’s created a two-tiered system of government, where government leaders know that they are free to break our laws, and they’ll have members of the pundit class and the political class and law professors standing up and saying, “Well, these are important intellectual issues that we need to grapple with, and it’s really not fair to put them inside of a courtroom or talk about prison.” And so, we’ve incentivized lawlessness in this country. I mean, the laws are clear that it’s criminal to do these things. The President has done them, and he—there’s no reason to treat him differently than any other citizen who breaks our laws.

And this couldn’t be repeated enough:

And that’s one of the interesting parts about what Senator Obama just did in supporting telecom amnesty, is that those lawsuits that exist, I mean, that were proceeding along, were really our only real avenue for finding out what the government did.

I think one critical thing here is that, you know, last year, James Comey, who was the number two person at the Justice Department, testified before Congress that they discovered that certain surveillance activities that the administration was engaged in, not what we end up knowing about, but other activities, were so patently illegal that the entire top level of the Justice Department had threatened to resign en masse unless it stopped immediately. And President Bush ordered that it continue for another forty-five days, even once he was told that, and it went on for two-and-a-half years.

We don’t know what that is. Those lawsuits are really the only way that we would have found out and that there would have been a legal accountability, but because of telecom immunity, those lawsuits are now going to terminate, those crimes are likely to be covered up….

Sorry about the lack of blockquotes, the last time I tried them I screwed them up, must go read up.

49. diane - 22 July 2008

48
post script,

jeez, what a bottom feeder, at the bottom of the above linked transcript:

…Cass Sunstein. He has co-authored the book with Richard Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness. He is an adviser to Senator Barack Obama.

Some people have no fucking shame….this is why I barely read shit anymore, it makes me want to explode for all of the scared and depressed little people who’s daily lives have become hellish, while vile people like this make money selling evil lies……

50. bayprairie - 22 July 2008

i have absolute zero expectations that anyone in the democratic party leadership is going make the slightest effort to have any member of bush cabal held criminally responsible for anything. sunstein confirms that i’m correct with my low expectations.

he’s laying out reverend obama’s line. i don’t believe he’s speaking only for himself.

married to samatha power as well now, isn’t he? inner circle!

51. marisacat - 22 July 2008

hmmm.. listening to KGO in SF, talk radio… very interesting.. a blow hard host who has been a SOB on sub prime (it’s all the fault of greedy little people, in fact KGO has had several reprehensible hours on the foreclosure mess) has been completely turned around by the Moyers show of last Friday, with Greider.

LOL except for the excellent profile of a neighborhood in Cleveland, it was all information that has been avialable…. tho Greider was great… plus we are in the heart of one of the Ground Zeros of subprime. Outskirts of Sacto, Stockton and parts of the East Bay and teh Delta region.

I linked to it last post with long snips

52. marisacat - 22 July 2008

50

is he? Married to Power?

I hd thought shw was single. What a hoot!

53. bayprairie - 22 July 2008

Ms Power arrived on the button of 4.30pm in a champagne coloured Lexus car bedecked with silk roses and hydrangeas driven by her uncle, Garry Horgan, from Cork.

Waiting a respectable five minutes until she got the nod from parish priest Fr Fergal Ryan, Ms Power in her cream all-lace dress and veil resplendent against her red hair, entered the church on the arm of her step-father Edmund Bourke.

She smiled nervously when wished well by friends of her mother.

Inside each seat was decked with white flowers and the hymns included the Cloud’s Veil. The Readings were ‘To everything there is a season’ and St Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians, on Love.

:::snip:::

Prayers of the faithful included one “for the victims of cruelty and injustice, for those who protect wildlife and animals and those who are poor and persecuted”.

54. moiv - 22 July 2008

How Oz went Mad Over Benedict.

Papal goodwill on such visits suggest little more than global tourism by the Holy See to trumpet worn positions. The event looks innocent enough, and god bothering of its own accord need not make frothing protesters of us all, apart from Richard Dawkins. Indeed, the only really excited ones seem to be those airborne followers of the event on the World Youth Day website who seem to have confused the event with a Toyota advertisement. (‘Oh what a feeling.’)

City residents have the good sense to do at each of these pilgrim’s events as they have always done over the centuries: profit from mass gullibility. At times like this, ‘new’ countries in the game of international pilgrim worship like Australia can only wish they had the equivalent of the Turin shroud. God need not be bad for capitalism.

:::

The state government of New South Wales had its own view of WYD. In what amounted to a crude, tyrannical excess of authority, the New South Wales government went out of its way to inflate police powers with the passage of various provisions affecting the World Youth Day Act. Police officers rarely shirk an effort to crack the odd skull in anger, but the police in Sydney were somewhat puzzled by being given power to arrest protesters on the simple charge of annoying Catholic pilgrims.

The wording of the Act was obtuse even by the standards of the most inept legal draftsman. The initial provisions penalized ‘conduct that causes annoyance or inconvenience to participants in a World Youth Day event.’ Wearing an anti-Pope T-shirt may well have cost a protester a penalty amounting to $5,500.

The Australian Federal Court did not disappoint civil libertarians, though their enthusiasm in victory was misplaced. The full bench decided in a lawsuit launched by activists Rachel Evans and Amber Pike that the Act ‘should not be interpreted as conferring powers that are repugnant to fundamental rights and freedoms at common law in the absence of clear authority from Parliament.’ The words ‘annoyance or’ were struck out. The ruling still left the word ‘inconvenience’ in place.

55. marisacat - 22 July 2008

Couple of dogs of [soft] war mated. What a hoot, thanks bay, for the link to the Irish paper..

56. bayprairie - 22 July 2008

and married on July 4th to boot!

57. marisacat - 22 July 2008

54

Don’t bitch about the pope.

Waht a joke it all is.

58. moiv - 22 July 2008

Bay, that’s just priceless. It sounds as though the bride never looked lovelier, so I hope the groom’s comb-over didn’t frizz in the rain.

Here’s a nugget from last May.

Here is a juicy bit of gossip, about the complicated love lives of three leading legal / political thinkers. From a Harvard Law School alum who was a year ahead of celebrity professor Samantha Power:

Cass Sunstein and Samantha Power are engaged, but apparently it’s all secret because Cass hasn’t told [his former paramour] Martha Nussbaum yet.

Well, it’s not a secret any more.

We reached out to both Professor Sunstein and Professor Power. Neither had any comment. If you happen to have more info, please email us.

The Sunstein-Power romance, as you may recall, blossomed when they were working for the Obama campaign. Now, of course, Senator Barack Obama is on the brink of securing the Democratic presidential nomination. If he wins the general election, expect both Sunstein and Power to land plum positions in the Obama administration.

:::

And what about Cass Sunstein? He’s not mentioned in the Washingtonian article, which focuses on Cabinet positions. But we could easily see Professor Sunstein, an authority on administrative law, snagging a seat on the prestigiously glistening D.C. Circuit — en route to a possible berth on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Expect these two to be the toast of the D.C. cocktail party circuit in 2009 — or, in the event of a John McCain victory, the most coveted company at Harvard faculty dinner parties.

59. marisacat - 22 July 2008

But we could easily see Professor Sunstein, an authority on administrative law, snagging a seat on the prestigiously glistening D.C. Circuit — en route to a possible berth on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Yeah I can see that too.

The U of Chicago and U of Chicago HOSPITALS are taking over. Nobody should be surprised.

60. moiv - 22 July 2008

In light of recent events, here’s an interesting profile of Sunstein and Nussbaum as a “power couple.”

She sits up straight on the edge of her chair behind her desk. He slouches, as tall men will, in the visitor’s chair. She is quiet kinesis, poised and beautiful. He tries to get comfortable, resting one ankle atop the opposite knee, and settles in with the physical confidence of an athlete. If someone trained as a lawyer can retain some of his boyishness, he has.

Is it hard for people burdened with such intellectual candlepower to find each other? They didn’t seem to have much trouble. But it’s clear that they apply what they know (which is a lot) to making their relationship work (which it does, very well).

Despite the seriousness of their work, they themselves are not always serious. Sunstein will call Nussbaum and disguise his voice pretending to be a journalist who wants very much to hear her views on some pressing issue. “Sometimes he pretends to be an admirer,” she says. “But I am an admirer,” he responds. Nussbaum thinks this is great fun.

:::

They say they have worked out—and eliminated the source of—many problems that vex other couples. They maintain separate apartments. They stay at her place, because it’s larger and more comfortable. Their longest argument lasted about an hour. They don’t hold grudges and never go to sleep angry. They say they are unplagued by moodiness and its attendant devilments.

Additionally, although Sunstein positions Nussbaum’s leanings somewhat to the left of his own, they agree about most issues. “But I’m angrier,” she says, scooting her chair forward. “I mean about political issues. Cass wants to be liked for what he says when he goes to Washington to talk to the Republicans. He wants them to be won over by his sweet reasonableness. I wouldn’t care what they thought.”

Sunstein tempers that characterization by saying, softly, “I like to think that people with whom I disagree are good.”

:::

Invitations to parties are filtered through Sunstein, who usually won’t feel like going. If they do, they don’t hang out together. And when Sunstein sees Nussbaum getting irritated across the room, he suppresses the instinct to interfere. “What she often wants to do is pursue the source of the irritation. To deter it would not be good. If Martha’s irritated, I should watch and see what happens.”

If they were assigned to assess each other’s strengths, Sunstein’s evaluation would include “tremendous generosity, insight, and never staying mad. She has a capacity for anger, but rarely against me. When she does get angry, I never worry that she doesn’t love me or is thinking ill of me,” he says.

What a relief.

61. marisacat - 22 July 2008

LOL Can’t we just do a quick global replace, SP for MN,
works for me! same gibberish slobber different name.

These people are all the same, mostly. Horrific egoists. Of the borrrrring variety

62. CSTAR - 22 July 2008

Given the amount of stuff that Nussbaum has written on love and sexuality this amorous “development” seems a bit ironic, and from her point of view, humiliating.

63. moiv - 22 July 2008

Nussbaum didn’t anticipate the pernicious influence exerted upon even the most settled “power couple” by the heady proximity to real power. Henry K called it the the greatest aphrodisiac for a reason.

Worth noting that Silda Wall and Eliot Spitzer were at the top of the “power couples” list.

64. CSTAR - 22 July 2008

63 This is a certainly unforeseen detour on a thread entitled “war over tits”…

65. marisacat - 22 July 2008

LOL

66. moiv - 22 July 2008

64

Here at Mcat those detours are not a bug, but a main feature. And sometimes even a double feature, which is always great for the popcorn concession. :-)

67. moiv - 23 July 2008

Obama’s Uncle Charlie sets the record straight.

After the war, Payne went to college in Kansas on the GI Bill and then to graduate school at the University of Chicago, where Obama would later lecture on constitutional law. He later became interested in computers and how they could be used in libraries. He retired at age 70 as assistant director of the University of Chicago’s library.

Payne is proud of his great-nephew, who is prominently displayed in family photos.

“He’s truly an astounding young man and always has been,” he said.

As attention turns to the Holocaust with Obama’s expected visit to the Israeli memorial on Wednesday, Payne reflected on the lessons of history.

“Clearly to me it’s proof that there’s no limit to what a man will do to man and what government out of control will do,” he said. “I guess we need to be on our guard eternally.”

Excellent advice.

68. moiv - 23 July 2008

Fascinating diary about the preservation of Lenin’s corpse.

As it turned out the only science job worth having in 1930′s Stalinist Russia was as Lenin’s embalmer, and Ilya Zbarsky took the job that his father offered him.

Ilya Zbarsky had a ring side seat in Soviet history – maybe comparable to that of Djilas, and the list of people he knew personally is astounding, Zinoviev, Bukarhin, Stalin himself, Khruschev, Beria, and many others.

In fact, he lived with Boris Pasternak, and in fact, Boris Pasternak was sleeping with his mother.

Later he would learn that his own scientific mentor, the irreverent co-embalmer of Lenin, Vorobiov, a sybarite supreme in a dire time, had once raped his sister-in-law, but that’s another tale.

And then on to the good stuff . . .

(Vorobiov) began by getting rid of the sutures that had been used to sew up the head and chest after the autopsy. Then having removed the lungs, liver, spleen and other viscera, he ordered the inside the ribcage to be flused out with distilled water. He next fixed the tissues with formalin…Wads of cotton wool steeped in a 1 percent solution of formaldehyde were laid over the face, hands and body…

…(he) did not want to use an ordinary metal bath, the surface of which might interact chemically with the components of the liquid, only a glass bath would rule out the risk…but frantic appeals from the OGPU to all laboratories in Moscow succeeded in proving only that such a bath was not to be found in Russia…

Vorobiov then considered the possibilty of a rubber bath abd Dzerzhinsky (head of the Soviet OGPU predecessor to the KGB) went in person to a rubber factor on the outskirts of Moscow. He was disappointed to find out… that it was a Saturday and nobody was working…He then scoured the neighborhood until he found the manager and then made him sound the factory alarm…this brought the workers running thinking there was a fire…the following Monday Lenin could be put in a rubber bath…

69. bayprairie - 23 July 2008

Bay, that’s just priceless. It sounds as though the bride never looked lovelier,

and never been kissed

They (nussbaum and sunstein) say they have worked out—and eliminated the source of—many problems that vex other couples.

‘cept for that much younger woman thing (23 years younger than she)

“But I’m angrier,” she (Nussbaum) says, scooting her chair forward. “I mean about political issues. Cass wants to be liked for what he says when he goes to Washington to talk to the Republicans.

ahhhhh zee democratik disease!

terminal in every instance.

70. marisacat - 23 July 2008

nu thred…………….

LINK

…………… 8) …………….


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