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spring 25 March 2011

Posted by marisacat in Divertissements, Germany.
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Three stork nests are pictured on the church tower in Kandern-Holzen, Germany

Three stork nests are pictured on the church tower in Kandern-Holzen, Germany   [EPA]

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1. marisacat - 25 March 2011

Joe Cirincione in Huff Po….

I remember the 2007 incidents, but I never heard of the actual dropping of hydrogen bombs over NC.

[H]iroshima and Fukushima, of course, are very different in fundamental ways. Hiroshima was an intentional bombing that happened in a blink, killing or injuring 135,000 people and destroying 70,000 buildings. Fukushima is the result of unprecedented natural disasters overwhelming safety systems with its consequences for the civilian population metered out over days, weeks or years.

But the connections between the two are just as fundamental.

Both involve our collective deception that we can always control the nuclear machines we invented. We cannot. There have been dozens of close calls, false alerts and near launches in the nuclear age. In one instance, a US bomber crash dropped two hydrogen bombs over North Carolina. Five out of six of the bomb’s arming devices activated — only the sixth prevented an actual nuclear detonation.

August 29, 2007 provides a more recent reminder. On that day the U.S. Air Force lost track of the equivalent of 60 Hiroshima bombs for 36 hours. A B-52 bomber flew across the country with six nuclear missiles tucked under its wings. Unknown to the air crews, the missiles were each armed with a 150-kiloton nuclear warhead, ten times the power of the bomb that destroyed Hiroshima. The crew thought they had loaded conventional, non-nuclear missiles. The worst news? No one noticed they were missing.

If anyone had asked 20 top experts before this event if anything like this was possible, they all would have said absolutely not.

Similarly, top experts in the nuclear power industry would have said Fukushima was impossible. In fact, safety plans for nuclear reactors around the world are based on the unlikely never happening. Cost considerations encourage designing plants to withstand likely earthquakes and natural disasters, but not all those that are possible.

Prepare for more stories on the 50…. What a mess of a web of a nightmare of a reality.

Because it sounds like it is moving to further mass tragedy in the too small exclusion zone around Fukushima reactors… Apparnlty no one, or hardly anyone, nowhere near te numbers needed, will go in in the numbers needed to bring food water or alternatively evacuation vehicles.

diane - 25 March 2011

thanks for that…that ..20007 ….oopsie …’nuclear tracking moment’ …(but the ‘puters know where they are, why should we have to PAY$$$$$$$ to track them ….WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA ..) recollect … had thought about ‘searching’ for it myself, but, I guess, ..didn’t want to end up at the dead end I knew I would: NO FOLLOWUP, NO FUCKING RESPONSIBILITY …..FUCKING GREED, DEATH, and INSANITY!

I’m kind of wishing I lived in Japan, cuz I don”t want to live in this FUCKER much longer if it’s going to continue like this …and I’d kind of like doing something really special before I leave this mother FUCKER, like saving lives that deserve to be saved.

(that is….sigh, if at this point …they even feel like living here any longer)

marisacat - 25 March 2011

ugh I think they have tons of problems in Japan, not to diminish the mess we are in. And TEPCO is lined up for a big fat bailout. Too Big To Fail. By the rate payers. Via the government.

Too say nothing of all the other problems.

Great health care tho and very safe streets….

sigh.

2. Madman in the Marketplace - 25 March 2011
diane - 25 March 2011

I think “the onion” was wrong there, it was more like folks were allowed a quarter second to acknowledge the travesty (that word hasn’t been trademarked yet has it?) before being choke chained to the hideous reality that’s been ‘gifted’ to us.

marisacat - 25 March 2011

i also saw an onion headline:

nuclear regulators say nothing can go wrong til something bad happens.

gotta hand it to them, they win [hello charlie s]

diane - 25 March 2011

clap hands …here comes ….?….

;0( but they haven’t won yet … :0)

and I … they don’t

ms_xeno - 26 March 2011

Was it really a whole fifteen minutes? I figured that my clocks were just running a little slow and needed new batteries. :p

3. diane - 25 March 2011

that pic … looks contrived … to my hopeless state …a three pretending to be a four …or a four pretending to be a three …

diane - 25 March 2011

and, no doubt, the number five, of ‘humanity,’ it’s been said,…is at the core of that conundrum…. has the power to destroy in untold numbers …

4. marisacat - 25 March 2011

Oh no.

He’s going to address us Monday night on Libya. I actually bought all the chatter all day that he or his handlers were resisting the idea of a speech on L.

Nope.

catnip - 25 March 2011

Maybe he’s hoping it’ll be over by then. Winning Libya’s Future!

marisacat - 25 March 2011

I really wonder what he is going to find t say.

People nattered on at me for hanging back, then the chiennes de guerre I keep around, Rice Powers and that woman Hilpac bitched at me. Hell I am a blade of grass in the wind. Go, no go… who cares. I still golf, take my vacas and have sports guys come to the WH. It’s a sweet life. Works for me. Libya, Fly No Fly. Who cares.

5. diane - 25 March 2011

not that I don’t think Joe Nachio might be a total asshole (but then again…he may not be a total asshole…anymore than the rest of us…..), but I loved that the quest (oops …qwest …and perhaps that explains something ….perhaps not….) legal counsel told the NSA to get fucked (despite qwest’s possibly self serving reasoning) and again, not that I hold him in high high regard, but I’m glad he called a few vultures … on their undie ‘fantasies’ …… (oh …and oopsie, …sorry joey ….jeralyns foun’ somun els to frend ….. I’m sure you’ll be able to get over it … ;0) )

6. diane - 25 March 2011


I still golf…

how bout those hoops? how’s that busted lip?

(ok, that was mean …., but it certainly doesn’t even approach the venality of what has gone ‘under his watch’ …a ‘watch’ which he clearly ‘aspired’ to)

diane - 25 March 2011

oops (waves…redfaced …how do I do the teeny font thingy? …….yeah..I DO HAVE A LOUD MOUTH AT TIMES …jeesh) meant to post under the comment 4 ‘subnest’ ……

diane - 26 March 2011

ahh well …now that I stuck my foot in it …once again …went out, bought another bottle of cheap red (the Russkies say it wards off radiation! …okay …so what if I didn’t buy it for that reason?) and apparently (hmmm spell check? …fuckin brits!) Ms Ruby Cat and I are the only ones awake? …Marisa are you watching a netflix honey? …with pizza! yum ;0)

diane - 26 March 2011

guess you’re asleep honey …where’s the teeny weeny whisper font? ……ms ruby (drowsey eyed and curled up now ….jus wanna kiss her paws ……OOPS she jus woke and checked to see if her claws were still there! ..then licked the paws, with fully stretched toesies n claws ….:0) ;0)) and I are gonna try to go get some sleep too …rest full dreams honey!!!!!!! ;0)

7. m - 26 March 2011

Art challenges Tunisian revolutionaries

The Artocracy project, featuring photos of ordinary Tunisians, has proven art can be just as provocative as politics.

http://english.aljazeera.net/indepth/features/2011/03/201132223217876176.html

diane - 26 March 2011

a hundred ordinary Tunisians, putting their images where only presidents once hung.

glad I caught that just as I was about to go to sleep ….;0)

Thank You Honey!

diane - 26 March 2011

(disclosure: the TED thang …referenced in your linked article (and Cali, “US” centric) has creeped me out, more times than not, …but I am a firm believer that there are more civilized ‘ordinary’ humans than civilized “leaders,”…and that’s what I’m agreeing with you about “m”)

diane - 26 March 2011

g’night & morn all (imagine a ruby cat, claws retracted, paw kiss there Marisa, …sweety is beddy bye now …will be fuckin wit’ me, first thing on the morrow, to wake the fuck up! ……;0) …)

8. diane - 26 March 2011

oh my. couldn’t sleep …..checkin’ round, and Lambert, grand snarker of “US” potassium iodine poppers (whoever they are? I don’t know any, and I live in Cali) referenced Glenn Greenwald’s late day piece on March 25, I bow to both, for this revelation:

Top Bush-era GITMO and Abu Ghraib psychologist is WH’s newest appointment

One of the most intense scandals the field of psychology has faced over the last decade is the involvement of several of its members in enabling Bush’s worldwide torture regime. Numerous health professionals worked for the U.S. government to help understand how best to mentally degrade and break down detainees. At the center of that controversy was — and is — Dr. Larry James. James, a retired Army colonel, was the Chief Psychologist at Guantanamo in 2003, at the height of the abuses at that camp, and then served in the same position at Abu Ghraib during 2004.

Today, Dr. James circulated an excited email announcing, “with great pride,” that he has now been selected to serve on the “White House Task Force entitled Enhancing the Psychological Well-Being of The Military Family.” In his new position, he will be meeting at the White House with Michelle Obama and other White House officials on Tuesday.

For his work at Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo, Dr. James was the subject of two formal ethics complaints in the two states where he is licensed to practice: Louisiana and Ohio. Those complaints [pdf file ;0( …… aww shit – diane] — 50 pages long and full of detailed and well-documented allegations — were filed by the International Human Rights Clinic of Harvard Law School’s Human Rights Program, on behalf of veterans, mental health professionals and others. The complaints detailed how James “was the senior psychologist of the Guantánamo BSCT, a small but influential group of mental health professionals whose job it was to advise on and participate in the interrogations, and to help create an environment designed to break down prisoners.” Specifically:

During his tenure at the prison, boys and men were threatened with rape and death for themselves and their family members; sexually, culturally, and religiously humiliated; forced naked; deprived of sleep; subjected to sensory deprivation, over-stimulation, and extreme isolation; short-shackled into stress positions for hours; and physically assaulted. The evidence indicates that abuse of this kind was systemic, that BSCT health professionals played an integral role in its planning and practice. . . .

diane - 26 March 2011

sorry, I neglected to include Glenn’s highlighting of the following “bolded” sentence near the end of the above excerpt:

The complaints detailed how James “was the senior psychologist of the Guantánamo BSCT, a small but influential group of mental health professionals whose job it was to advise on and participate in the interrogations, and to help create an environment designed to break down prisoners.”

marisacat - 26 March 2011

I cannot remember now exactly but iirc when this group became public knowledge, think the American Society of Pychologists (or Psychiatrists, whatever it is called) came out against it.

catnip - 26 March 2011
diane - 27 March 2011

Some of the APA muckety mucks were pretty much entrenched in it (no surprise), but many members were outraged at the lack of effective response from the APA Ethics Department:

A Critique of Stephen Behnke’s Letter to the ACLU –
American Psychological Association Supports Psychologist Engagement in Bush Regime Interrogations

By STEPHEN SOLDZ
May 27, 2008

Dr. Behnke’s letter to the ACLU was widely distributed within the APA as a defense of the association’s long-contested policy. It therefore important to carefully examine his claims in the context of what is known about interrogation abuses in Iraq. In a separate article [I’ve linked this directly below – diane], Trudy Bond responded to Dr. Behnke’s claims in the same letter, questioning his assertions that the APA is willing to adjudicate reports of psychologists participating in detainee abuse. I will focus instead here on examining Dr. Behnke’s claim that the Church Report supports the APA’s policy of participation in detainee interrogations. In this process I briefly revisit previous justifications for APA policy.

Article referred to in the above quote. At the end of the piece Dr. Bond lists her own numerous fruitless formal attempts to elicit a response from Behnka, APA Ethics Director (and still on board) as to why psychologists were involved in torture, …ending the piece:

An Open Letter to Dr. Stephen Behnke on Psychologists Engaged in Torture
If Not Now, When?

By Dr. TRUDY BOND
May 19, 2008

As you well know, Dr. Behnke, Dr. Leso is not the only psychologist who has had complaints filed against him for involvement in torture, complaints that have not been “adjudicated” by your office. America’s role as a torture nation is part of our national emergency. It’s past time for APA to match words with deeds.

If not now, when?

Sincerely,
Dr. Trudy Bond

Found this extensive 2005-2008 link page on the issue:

Psychologists and interrogations – Key articles

diane - 27 March 2011

(sorry, “Behnke,” not “Benhka)

diane - 27 March 2011

Doing a current check on Stephen Soldz (see above link, also the 2005-2008 link page was his) this current piece:

The Dark Side of “Comprehensive Soldier Fitness”

March 26th, 2011

By Roy Eidelson, Marc Pilisuk, and Stephen Soldz

Why is the world’s largest organization of psychologists so aggressively promoting a new, massive, and untested military program? The APA’s enthusiasm for mandatory “resilience training” for all U.S. soldiers is troubling on many counts.

The January 2011 issue of the American Psychologist, the American Psychological Association’s (APA) flagship journal, is devoted entirely to 13 articles that detail and celebrate the virtues of a new U.S. Army-APA collaboration. Built around positive psychology and with key contributions from former APA president Martin Seligman and his colleagues, Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) is a $125 million resilience training initiative designed to reduce and prevent the adverse psychological consequences of combat for our soldiers and veterans. While these are undoubtedly worthy aspirations, the special issue is nevertheless troubling in several important respects: the authors of the articles, all of whom are involved in the CSF program, offer very little discussion of conceptual and ethical considerations; the special issue does not provide a forum for any independent critical or cautionary voices whatsoever; and through this format, the APA itself has adopted a jingoistic cheerleading stance toward a research project about which many crucial questions should be posed. We discuss these and related concerns below.

[more]

marisacat - 26 March 2011

Does it mention Mrs Petraeus? Because iirc, she is involved with that health of mil families bullshite shit. She was going around with Snob last month, think it was last month, they dropped in on a couple mil bases.

Just saw this in the text, yes I bet it is the same group.

In his new position, he will be meeting at the White House with Michelle Obama and other White House officials on Tuesday.

SO HOW IS THAT VOTE WORKING FOR YOU? (those who did vote for him)

Defend this one.

BooHooHooMan - 26 March 2011

HaHa. Telegraph to Drudge, and no doubt…
to OBAMA.

AL QAEDA FIGHTERS JOIN LIBYAN REBELS

Well, we knew these floaters wouldn’t be long before popping up in the ole Change-O punch bowl.
GooD Luck with the Party! Refreshing, no?

Confusing tho, I mean, I thought WE were the Al Qaeda fighters who just joined the Libyan rebels. Or was it that three day trial membership in the U.N.? You know, like that No Cost, No Obbylegation thing we can unsubscribe to at NATO.

Whatever. Al Qaeda™. NineLeven™.
Coalition of the Shilling™. NATO™.
Fight Fight Fight™.

Did Bush ever LEAVE?

BooHooHooMan - 26 March 2011

:lol: Italian newspaper even!

In an interview with the Italian newspaper Il Sole 24 Ore, Mr al-Hasidi admitted :lol: that he had recruited “around 25″ men from the Derna area in eastern Libya to fight against coalition troops in Iraq. Some of them, he said, :lol: are “today are on the front lines in Adjabiya”.

Let’ see how fibber Barry works the dog-whistle here. Which he, alas Al Qaeda ®, will.

Gad, they didn’t even bother writing new material for him.

marisacat - 26 March 2011

Cockburn at Cpunch has a version of the AQ story that even sounds credible and he is not the only one. It is in his piece that rides at the top fo the current weekend postings…

My guess would be that the very wealthy tribe in the East (forget the name) has beeen playing, like the Saudis do, with AQ or some form of AQ. (To the extent any of this exists, etc, also, but, and … )

BooHooHooMan - 26 March 2011

Well, my take is if they’re not OBL – ready,
we may well make AQ out of them yet..

9. ts - 26 March 2011
marisacat - 26 March 2011

aren’t they amazing? And so many of them….

brinn - 26 March 2011

Thanks for that, ts!

How’s the new babe? Getting much sleep? ;)

marisacat - 26 March 2011

rockaby baby… in the tree tops…

And so on…
;)

ts - 26 March 2011

The wife and I have split the work so I get the 2 year old and she takes care of the newborn. So I get one six hour nap at night and a two hour one in the afternoon. She gets regular three hour naps all day. Not sure which of us is the luckier one.

10. BooHooHooMan - 26 March 2011

So..Clinton supporter, New York rounder, DNC Rockette, etc, what can you say other than she was right about Barry

Geraldine Ferraro died today.

No word yet, as these things go, on complications relating to those injuries sustained after the Clintons threw her under the bus in those elevating Great Post Racial Primaries of 2008.

marisacat - 26 March 2011

Barry used her to try (tho as tactic it ultimately failed) to divert from Pastor Wright. I tracked it all back, the Wright story broke late (to the public) late in the week, on late Tuesday on his campaign plane (iirc) his camp broke the story of her comments to a little West Coast paper, the Torrance Breeze, alsmot two weeks before.

By early in the week … was it ABC that broke Wright vids? I forget, whoever broke it, would have been calling Barry O camp for hard comments on a soon to break story.

(This is not an endorsement of Gerry F) As it all raged, I posted an earlier interview from Ob (that was posted at his campaign site) AND some comments from Kerry, that both said the same thing as Gerry.

Not similar, SAME.

But you know how it goes and went, only what can be perceived as racism against Barry O or the wif matters. Nothing else.

BooHooHooMan - 26 March 2011

I so love brunch at your place! LOL. The carmelisted Dems on toast points are not to be missed!

BooHooHooMan - 26 March 2011

oops – *carmelised* Dems… karma-liased?
Toast points for all, anyways.. :wink:

11. marisacat - 26 March 2011

THE SHOWS:

–NBC’s “Meet the Press“: Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Secretary of Defense Robert Gates; Sen. Dick Lugar (R-IN); roundtable with the Washington Post’s Bob Woodward, Ted Koppel, Center for a New American Security senior fellow and author Tom Ricks and NBC’s Savannah Guthrie

–ABC’s “This Week“: Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Secretary of Defense Robert Gates; former Secretary of State Donald Rumsfeld (“Known and Unknown”); roundtable with ABC News’ George Will, Egyptian journalist Mona Eltahawy, The Atlantic’s Jeffrey Goldberg and former Rep. Joe Sestak (D-PA) (substitute host: Jake Tapper)

–CBS’s “Face the Nation“: Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Secretary of Defense Robert Gates

–”Fox News Sunday“: Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich (R-GA); Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) and Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-CT); roundtable with Fox News’ Brit Hume, Fortune’s Nina Easton, the Weekly Standard’s Bill Kristol and Fox News’ Juan Williams

–CNN’s “State of the Union“: Sen. Carl Levin (D-MI); former National Security Adviser Stephen Hadley and former CIA Director Gen. Michael Hayden; Ploughshares Fund President Joe Cirincione; roundtable with former Bush CBO Director Douglas Holtz-Eakin and former Clinton OMB Director Alice Rivlin

–CNN’s “Fareed Zakaria GPS Live” (SUN 10 a.m. / 1 p.m. ET): Author and New Yorker staff writer Malcolm Gladwell (“Outliers: The Story of Success”); roundtable discussion moderated by CNN’s Gloria Borger with Council on Foreign Relations President Dr. Richard Haass, Woodrow Wilson International Center President and former Rep. Jane Harman (D-CA), the Brookings Institution’s Robert Kagan and former DNI and former U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. John Negroponte

–Univision’s “Al Punto“: President Obama; El Salvador President Mauricio Funes; Univision Networks President Cesar Conde; White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics Deputy Director Jose Rico; actors Robert De Niro and Bradley Cooper; roundtable with La Prensa Grafica correspondent Julio Marenco and Enlace De San Diego correspondent Hiram Soto

12. catnip - 26 March 2011
13. Madman in the Marketplace - 26 March 2011

Grass Roots: Capitol Police have blocked meal for the homeless in wake of protests

A volunteer group that puts out a spread for homeless people every Sunday afternoon has been out in the cold for weeks since the Capitol Police barred them from the statehouse, where they’ve been serving up a weekly meal for years.

Edged out by crowds of protesters in mid-February, Savory Sunday organizers say Capitol Police refused last Sunday to let volunteers and the people they feed shelter themselves under the portico of the Capitol, despite the cold and rainy weather.

The meal served at the Capitol is popular with homeless people who congregate downtown, but its future is up in the air.

Capitol Police want to meet with meal organizers “to see if they can accommodate them,” Carla Vigue, a spokeswoman for the Department of Administration, which oversees the Capitol Police, told me Friday afternoon. The “cafeteria” area in the basement where the group serves the meal, was used as a staging area for police during the peak of the protests, but is less in need now, she says.

But meal organizer Tom Barry tells me that Capitol Police told him Friday that the group could resume serving on April 3. The arrangement would be week-to-week, Barry says, depending on the number of protesters at the Capitol.

And, everyone entering the Capitol for the meal would have to have all their belongings screened at a checkpoint, like everyone else entering the building these days.

“That’s disturbing,” Barry says. “Most of the people who come have everything they own in a backpack. Being subject to screening is going to deter people.”

Savory Sunday has been preparing meals at a nearby church and serving them up in the “cafeteria” — really just some tables and chairs next to a vending machine area — in the basement of the Capitol for about four years, says group organizer Dale Lavelle.

The group feeds 60 to 80 people at 2 p.m. each Sunday, sometimes as many as 120 people, according to Lavelle. The effort relies totally on volunteers, about 15 to 20 each week, many of whom are students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

marisacat - 26 March 2011

Oh but Oprah said it really is now the government of the people!

How taht happens with shoe sales man Ob, a dead and sold out congress, a corrupt capital police, I sure don’t know.

AND millions starving.

marisacat - 26 March 2011

OH! I see it is Wisconsin.

Well same diff. A few miles N and W.

14. marisacat - 26 March 2011
catnip - 27 March 2011

The general situation is this: if Harper doesn’t get a majority government, he will be forced to resign, and if Michael Ignatieff doesn’t win a minority government, he will be forced to resign. The most likely outcome is another Conservative minority government, and therefore both of them are likely gone within a year or two. I intend to do whatever I can to ensure that outcome.

:)

Bring out your dead!

15. marisacat - 27 March 2011

Don’t worry!!!!!!!!!!

After hours of these headlines and leading grafs, it is now nnounced that these readings are

a Mistake.

Radiation levels reach new highs as conditions worsen for workers

Washington Post – Chico Harlan, Michael Chandler – ‎52 minutes ago

TOKYO — Water leaking from a reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant measured 10 million times more radioactive than usual and air in the same unit was four times higher than the …

***

Radioactivity Soars at Japan Nuclear Plant

Voice of America – Martyn Williams – ‎2 hours ago

Japan says levels of radiation contamination in water inside part of the Fukushima nuclear power plant have increased sharply. Workers at the plant spent the day Sunday on improvements to the water pumping system that is keeping the reactors cool. …

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Japan nuclear plant: workers evacuated after radiation levels soar

The Guardian – ‎2 hours ago‎

Radioactivity levels in one part of the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant are 10m times higher than normal, Japanese officials have said, amid warnings that the operation to avert disaster at the facility could last for months. …

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Status report: Reactor-by-reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi plant

CNN International – ‎2 hours ago

By the CNN Wire Staff Some work is halted in parts of units Nos. 2 and 3, due to contaminated pooled water Radiation in pooled water in the No. 2 unit’s turbine building is 10 million times normal (CNN) — Since March 11, the six reactors at the …

****

Radiation Level Soars At Nuclear Plant

Sky News – ‎58 minutes ago‎

Radiation levels at Japan’s Fukushima nuclear plant have reached 10 million times the usual level, posing a deadly threat to workers. Tokyo Electric Power Co said radiation in the water of the No2 reactor was measured at more than 1000 millisieverts an …

Don’t worry.

16. mattes - 27 March 2011

Ted Koppel…longtime friends with Kissinger…who’d have thought!

marisacat - 27 March 2011

Barbara Boxer too…

marisacat - 27 March 2011

Ooops no… I got myself in a mental mangle. SHE is decades long friend of Sharon.

(not that there is a difference)

m - 27 March 2011

They cover all the bases.

17. catnip - 27 March 2011

Escobar: It’s not a “war”. It’s a “time limited etc”.

Welcome to the new NATO quagmire

This predictable coup de theater (see Endgame: Divide, Rule and roll with the oil Asia Times Online, March 25) does not alter the fact Odyssey Dawn remains an American war. Well, not a war, according to the White House, but a “time-limited, scope-limited military action”.

For the moment it’s a time-limited etc conducted by General Carter Ham, out of his Africom headquarters in Stuttgart, Germany (none among 53 African countries wanted Africom). Next week it will become a time-limited etc conducted by US Admiral James Stavridis, NATO’s top military commander.

For all practical purposes it’s an all-American time-limited etc affair – enforced by Globocop NATO, with a handy Pentagon back up in the form of readily available “interdiction strike packages” – inimitable Pentagon speak for fighter jets loaded with missiles and ready to strike.

Madman in the Marketplace - 27 March 2011

wait, I thought it was a KINETIC military action!?!?

It makes the peasants nervous when the Lords their and their town criers’ can’t keep their euphemisms straight!

catnip - 27 March 2011

Kinetic? So we can all play war criminals in our living rooms now?

Speaking of military assholes:

Defense Secretary: Libya Did Not Pose Threat to U.S., Was Not ‘Vital National Interest’ to Intervene

18. catnip - 27 March 2011

A dickish post by Juan Cole on the time limited etc.

marisacat - 27 March 2011

He is too close to the national level Dems.

19. marisacat - 27 March 2011

hmm I’ve linked to commentary from this activist before, but not such a clear prediction for the SW of Tokyo reactor:

(Reuters) – The nuclear safety crisis entering its third week in Japan was not exactly the disaster that long-term activist and author Takashi Hirose foresaw in his book last summer, “Nuclear Reactor Time Bomb”.

But except for the location — Hirose had predicted an imminent megaquake and nuclear accident at the Hamaoka plant 200 km southwest of Tokyo, not the Fukushima Daiichi plant 240 km northeast — the scenario depicted in his first book on nuclear power in 15 years has proved eerily prescient.

Japanese authorities evacuated workers on Sunday from a reactor building they were working in after high doses of radiation were detected at a crippled nuclear power plant.

As Hirose watches what he believes is a bungled response by the government and Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) (9501.T), which runs the plant, his fears are as strong as ever that a repeat is set to hit on the other side of the Japanese capital.

“I think it will definitely occur soon,” he said, citing geological research on earthquake cycles suggesting that a massive quake may be imminent in the Tokai region near the Hamaoka plant.

20. Madman in the Marketplace - 27 March 2011

more from WI:

Vital Signs: State GOP health bills mirror model ALEC legislation

All the fuss this week over ALEC, a right-wing organization said to be the mastermind behind a nationwide wave of conservative proposals and laws, inspired me to look into whether the group has anything to do with a spate of recent health legislation from Gov. Scott Walker and Republican lawmakers.

My first step was to consult an online “study guide” about the shadowy American Legislative Exchange Council written by UW-Madison history professor William Cronon. The state GOP has filed an open records request seeking access to Cronon’s e-mails, and I was curious to see what they were upset about.

A bunch of links and some digging later, I tracked down ALEC’s The State Legislators Guide to Repealing ObamaCare. (NOTE: The original link I provided to this guide no longer works. Here is another. Scroll down and hit “Repealing Obamacare.” We’ll see if this link lasts.) It looks like our governor and Republican legislators could indeed be following this handy manual. Several health bills the Republicans have proposed and passed this year, or are about to propose (and probably pass, given their majority,) mirror ALEC’s “model legislation.”

But so what, asks Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald, R-Juneau, when I call him about my discovery. Fitzgerald says he has been a proud member of ALEC since he first became a legislator in 1994, and is currently the Wisconsin State Chairman. State lawmakers have always turned to such national organizations for help brainstorming ideas and crafting legislation, Fitzgerald says. “These groups are about exchanging ideas between different state legislators from around the country to be sure we’re not isolating ourselves in Wisconsin,” he tells me.

ALEC claims 2,500 legislative members, a third of all state lawmakers in the country. “It’s very well run, probably a little bit conservative, but many Democrats are members, too,” Fitzgerald says. “It’s a great organization.”

What’s so great about it? “First and foremost, because a lot of the committees crank out what I would consider boilerplate legislation, stuff that’s sweeping the nation,” he says. “Obviously legislators do this all the time, pirate bills from one state that they think is a good idea into another state.”

Democrats also get ideas and inspiration and copycat legislation from such groups. But some people nervous about ALEC claim there is a difference. Cronon’s blog post “Who’s Really Behind Recent Republican Legislation in Wisconsin and Elsewhere” made a splash not so much because it exposes the truth about how bills we assumed were homegrown are sometimes the cookie-cutter products of such groups with an agenda, but because of his scholarly arguments that the corporate and wealthy interests behind ALEC (which others note include the billionaire Koch brothers) are far more organized, coordinated, and stealthy than anything we’ve seen before in this country.

It’s a claim those critical of the power of “union thugs” may dispute, but one ALEC itself seems to agree with: since its founding 35 years ago, according to the Legislators’ Guide, ALEC has “amassed an unmatched record of achieving groundbreaking changes in public policy.” An ALEC membership brochure I found online claims that in each legislative cycle, members in 50 states introduce 1,000 pieces of legislation based on its work, and 17% of these bills are enacted into law.

21. catnip - 27 March 2011

Vice President’s staff lock journalist in a closet for hours during a fundraiser to stop him talking to guests

Yes, the Daily Mail is a rag but the story also appears on the Orlando Sentinel’s blog.

marisacat - 27 March 2011

oh I lve the Daily Mail. The MIrror too… and the Sun.

I will grab information where ever.

The Mirror (think it was) had lots of details on the VTech killings.

marisacat - 27 March 2011

Of course that is some level of kidnap.

catnip - 27 March 2011

One would think!

marisacat - 27 March 2011

Oh I am sure it was necessary for national security.

It is how they will get around everyting. Even when, like Libya they admit, not an issue….

22. diane - 27 March 2011

Rest in Peace Joe Bageant

Joe Bageant, 1946-2011
After a vibrant life, Joe Bageant died yesterday following a four-month struggle with cancer. He was 64. Joe is survived by his wife, Barbara, his three children, Timothy, Patrick and Elizabeth, and thousands of friends and admirers. He is also survived by his work and ideas.

According to Joe’s wishes, he will be cremated. His family will hold a private memorial service.

catnip - 27 March 2011

That’s a loss. :(

diane - 27 March 2011

yeah …I feel bad that the one online comment I remember making about him, was a miffed one about guy issues, because I really valued so much of his commentary. I hope Rainbow Pie is available at the ‘mortar and brick’ stores (I’m hoping to die without ever having to purchase online …just my ‘crankiness’ I suppose) ….

;0(

marisacat - 27 March 2011

oh what a shame…

diane - 27 March 2011

(thanks so much for ‘presenting’ him Marisa, I would have never known about him if it weren’t for you honey.)

marisacat - 27 March 2011

I hink it was Madman who first sent me a link to something Bageant wrote…

Another wonderful thing about his site were the letters to him that he published. Just absolutely fantastic.

diane - 27 March 2011

kisses to Madman too then! …. yeah I enjoyed reading those letters …so much absence of pretense on his site ..so much humanity …in its raggedy clothing …

23. diane - 27 March 2011

I thought this was kind of interesting about Libya, but then again, anything goin’ on, with no seeming interruption, within the close proximity of DC, seems to always perk my ears up:

New rebel leader spent much of past 20 years in suburban Virginia

Since coming to the United States in the early 1990s, Hifter lived in suburban Virginia outside Washington, D.C. Badr said he was unsure exactly what Hifter did to support himself, and that Hifter primarily focused on helping his large family.

catnip - 27 March 2011

Things that make you go hmmm…

diane - 27 March 2011

and so fuckin many of em honey ….jeeeeesh …

diane - 27 March 2011

(I really miss Arsenio Hall, paraphrasing?:

How come ya see so many women dating bald men, but never see any men dating bald women?

despite whatever faults he had, he seemed far, far more humane than Jay Leno)

24. diane - 27 March 2011

from Japan Today, 100,000 times is bad enough:

Problems mount at reactor after mistaken report of water radiation level
Monday 28th March, 06:45 AM JST

FUKUSHIMA — Authorities on Monday faced an increasing challenge of removing highly radioactive water found inside buildings near some troubled nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi plant, with the radiation level of the surface of the pool in the basement of the No. 2 reactor’s turbine building found to be more than 1,000 millisieverts per hour.

Exposure to such an environment for four hours would raise the risk of dying in 30 days. Hidehiko Nishiyama, spokesman for the government’s nuclear safety agency, said the figure is ‘‘quite high’’ but authorities must find a way to pump out the water without sending workers too close to push ahead with the restoration work.

Plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) said early Monday the concentration of radioactive substances of the puddle was 100,000 times higher than that usually measured in water in a reactor core, correcting its earlier analysis of 10 million times higher.

[more,/b>]

diane - 27 March 2011

(oops …the link, “[more,/b>],” looks funky, but it works)

diane - 27 March 2011

this, from the same source, may be somewhat telling too ….

25. marisacat - 27 March 2011

Neue

LINK

………. 8)


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